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Healthy Wealthy & Smart is where healthcare meets business. We interview innovators in healthcare, physical therapy, and entrepreneurship to draw our their expert tips, tools, and strategies to ensure both positive outcomes for your patients and your business.
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Now displaying: November, 2020
Nov 30, 2020

Episode Summary

Are you willing to experience anything?

In this episode, the Founder and CEO of MEG Business Management, Brian Gallagher, talks about the power of the intrapreneur and entrepreneur in private practice.

Brian graduated with a BSc in Physical Therapy from Daemen College in 1992. Soon after, he founded Gateway Health Services, which quickly became one of the largest staffing companies in Maryland. In 1999, he founded Cypress Creek Therapy, which was awarded the Anne Arundel County’s “Most Family Friendly Business” for several consecutive years, and in 2011, Advance Magazine awarded CCT as the “National Practice of the Year”. In 2006, Brian founded MEG Business Management and has grown to become among the top 10% of private practices across the US.

Today, we learn about the difference between an intrapreneur and an entrepreneur, the four types of PT owners, and Brian gives practice owners some advice on the interview process. He tells us why he sold his practice with a contingency, and how the current environment is ideal for entrepreneurs.

We get to hear about the 4 C’s, how we can become a successful Go-Getter Owner, and Brian gives his younger self some advice, all on today’s episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.

Key Takeaways

 

•       “Typically, an intrapreneur is a manager within a company who assumes no financial risk, but they’re willing to promote and execute on the development and implementation of innovative products or services.”

“An entrepreneur is similar, but it’s one who will find the needs out there within the business community, and simply fill them by developing their own ideas into actualities, by assuming the full financial risk and development of that idea through a business model of their choice.”

•       “Your practice is a reflection of you as an owner. Figure out which type of owner you are first.”

•       “The secret to successful hiring so that you can be correct 85% of the time is that you have to get the entire team involved in the hiring process.”

•       There are 4 types of PT owners: The Innocent Owner, The Caregiver Owner, The Know-It-All Owner, and The Go-Getter Owner.

The innocent owner – the person that falls into ownership, and is managing based on census. They never really thought about being an owner; they just had an opportunity.

 

The caregiver owner – they assume the perspective of a clinician first and owner second. They tend to run their clinics like it’s a democracy.

The know-it-all owner – through their life’s experiences, they’re not open to new ideas.

The go-getter owner – they have an entrepreneurial spirit, they like to manage based on performance, and they’re in a continuous pursuit of knowledge.

•       “This is an entrepreneur heaven right now.”

•       “If we’re going to sit here and go through our profession, and continue to colour inside the lines and make our picture like everybody else’s, you’re only going to get that.”

•       “When you ask what the common denominator is to all success, the highest thing would be confidence.”

•       “Transparency breeds trust.”

•       “The secret to success is giving.”

“I hate a win-win relationship. A win-win relationship implies that I’m going to allow you to win as long as you help me win.”

•       “Don’t react; respond.”

Book Mention

The Go-Giver, by Bob Burg and John David Mann

Suggested Keywords

Intrapreneur, Entrepreneur, Owner, Courage, Capability, Commitment, Confidence, Success, Listen, Introspection,

To learn more, follow Brian at:

Email: info@megbusiness.com

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LinkedIn

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More about Brian: 

In 1997, Brian founded what became one of Maryland’s largest therapy staffing companies, while at the same time launching a multi-site private practice that resulted in a sale in 2006. Brian re-acquired the practice in 2008, thus doubling it, before winning “Practice of the Year” in 2011. MEG Business Management began in 2006 as an educational coaching company training owners and their key employees on innovative practice management strategies. Today MEG has taken another major leap forward by developing a Virtual Training platform that practice owners can now have the tools and training resources to professionally enhance, track and manage employee performance, and hold in compliance with every employee in the company. This platform is available 24/7, 365 days per year. When Brian is not coaching, or working on the VT training platform, he can be found giving lectures at the APTA, PPS and CSM Annual Conferences, as well as APTA State Chapters and DPT Schools across the country. Brian believes strongly in giving back to the profession of physical therapy and does so by supporting the APTA through lecturing, writing articles, and performing webinars.

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Read the transcript: 

Speaker 1 (00:01):

Hey, Brian, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on,

Speaker 2 (00:05):

Oh, thank you so much, Karen. Thanks for taking the time and hooking up with me and doing the show.

Speaker 1 (00:10):

Yeah, well, I'm actually really looking forward to the topic today because it's something that I've spoken about a lot and that I have friends of mine who are business owners and, and love to empower their employees. So today we're talking about the power of the intrepreneur and the entrepreneur in private practice. So before we get into it, can you define the difference between those two terms?

Speaker 2 (00:39):

Yeah. And there's lots of definitions out there. I think if we Google it or YouTube, it you're all gonna, you know, find various forms of definitions for this. But for me, and I've always operated under this basic definition that typically an intrepreneur is a manager within the company who assumes no financial risk, but they're willing to promote and execute on the development and implementation of innovative products or services. In our case, it would be services and they do that via marketing branding, or other various forms of public relations, but they're innovating within somebody else's company. And that's my definition, that's my operating definition of an entrepreneur.

Speaker 1 (01:19):

And so when you're, when you're thinking about an injury, an intrepreneur and it can be a person who takes the initiative to maybe start a new program and within a physical therapy practice or right, something like that,

Speaker 2 (01:41):

Something like that, it could be as basic. And as simple as that, where they've taken an idea, they've worked it through to a concept and then they've developed that concept into an actuality. So that's what I really see with an entrepreneur. I have certain characteristics that we look for, and I think we'll talk about a little bit later that will really give you the identifying markers of an entrepreneur and what you should seek in an entrepreneur within your clinic, because an entrepreneur is similar, but it's one who will find the needs out there within the business community, whatever the market is that they're in and simply fill them by developing their own ideas into actualities by assuming the full financial risk and development of that idea through a business model of their choice, through the development of their business operations. So innovating within your own company is more of that, of an entrepreneur, assuming that financial risk. And that's really the defining factors between the entrepreneur and entrepreneur.

Speaker 1 (02:37):

And so what does, what does it take for one to stand out as an entrepreneur? So if I'm the entrepreneur, I own the business. What am I looking for for this? For a standout entrepreneur? Okay.

Speaker 2 (02:52):

All right. Well, I have a good story for that. And just to give you an example of a, of an entrepreneur, you know, it was several years ago. I, my clinics are in Maryland and I live in Florida and so I had six offices in Maryland and I was running them from Florida and I had a team that I had built. And so I had a chief operating officer working for me. Her name is Denise, she's now the CEO of Meg. And she runs our whole billing division. But at the time she was running the clinics and our largest clinic, it's a, you know, a 8,000 square foot office. And I got to talking to her on one Monday morning and I was asking her about, you know actually I didn't do my normal, that, that's how it actually came up. I was talking to her Monday morning, I got right into business, which is unusual for me.

Speaker 2 (03:33):

I'm usually like, how was your weekend? And how's the kids what's going on, you know, fill me in and all right, let's get start. But I was in a rush and I just got right into it. And she just started spouting off the things I wanted to know and just hitting it. And then I caught myself and I said, you know what, Denise, I'm so sorry. I apologize. I didn't even mean to ask you about your weekend. You know, how's your weekend go. And to my surprise, she says, well, you know, the air conditioning unit kind of backed up and it flooded the whole place I had to bring in a fan system. And my husband, I lifted the carpets and we dried them all out and got them down. We didn't miss a beat. We were ready Monday morning when the, when the patients got in here.

Speaker 2 (04:05):

So we're all, you know, find a good, I'm like, Oh my gosh, I had no idea. Like she never called me. She never made that problem. My problem. And I remember getting off the phone and saying to myself, what a level of responsibility, you know, what a level of responsibility. And that's one of the key factors that I look for in an entrepreneur. Now, in this case, I'm not giving you that shining, you know, example of somebody who started a women's health program or a pediatric program. I mean, she's obviously had done that through her time with me, but just this personality characteristic of I'm going to own the responsibility of this situation or this individual or this environmental breakdown, because it is my level of responsibility. And that's somebody who is thinking beyond themselves. And that always stuck with me that she just took that being this on, if you will, of an entrepreneur, when in fact this isn't even her clinic and that's really the sign of a true entrepreneur.

Speaker 1 (05:00):

Yeah. So someone who's really willing to take the initiative and to kind of really think of the, it sounds like someone who's really going to think of that clinic as, as their own, and really have a stake in it. You know, a true sort of emotional stake in the clinic and a sense of pride in, in where they work and what they're doing

Speaker 2 (05:21):

Exactly. And they typically come to the table, you know, if you're hiring well, and you're building that management team around you, you're looking for the foundation, right? I mean, every bridge is only as good as the foundation. And the foundation that I'm always looking for is does this individual have the personality, characteristics of confront, right? Are they willing to say what needs to be said to whomever? They need to say it to now, of course you communicate in manners. You never go out manners, but you can't shy away. And we live in a culture. Now we're in an environment where nobody really wants to offend anybody. Nobody literally wants to tell anybody anything they don't want to hear. But in fact, if you're raising children and many of your listeners probably have children, you can't raise your kids and say yes to everything for a month.

Speaker 2 (06:02):

Yes. Chocolate cake for dinner. Yes. You can go to bed when you want. Yes. You can have candy in the grocery store line, I'll visit your house a month later. It'll be chaos. It'll be a nightmare. Right? So when we run our clinic, we have to have that level of discipline. And that means you have to have that quality of confront. I need to be willing to confront my staff, say what needs to be said, always within good manners. And that's when it comes down to the, the, the equation of communication, you know, how can I communicate in a manner that I can bring about understanding, right? Because after understanding comes agreement, and we're always striving for agreement, but you know, that's the final as the final marker. And then the, the last two building blocks of foundation, I think that really make an intrepreneur entrepreneur is accountability and responsibility.

Speaker 2 (06:43):

And the difference between those two in my mind is accountability is one who's who owns the obligation and willingness to be accountable for their own actions. But responsibility is like the example I gave of Denise, where she took full responsibility for the whole wellbeing of the clinic and everybody inside it. So just to summarize, I'm always looking for who has a high level of confront who can communicate and bring about duplication and understanding and the art of their communication and who can be accountable to their own actions as well as responsible to that of others as well as situations. So I'm always looking for that and if I don't have them, how can I grow me?

Speaker 1 (07:19):

And, you know, I love the fact that you're always looking for that. So what advice do you have for a practice owner who is interviewing people, you know, to come and work in their clinic? Cause it's, I think it's hard, let's say in one or two interviews to kind of get those for confrontation communication, you'll get countability responsibility. So what advice do you have for business owners in those first couple of interviews to hire someone to kind of get this, this type of intrepreneur, if that's what you're looking for in your clinic.

Speaker 2 (08:00):

Yeah. And if you're looking to get distance from your practice, if you're looking to get freedom and flexibility, that's typically what we're trying to hire. Right. So that's a great question. You're asking a fantastic question. I think my answer is going to surprise you. I don't think it's going to be the path that you may be expecting. I think what my advice would be based on my experience now, I've been in and out of 400 offices. I've been in every state in the United States, helping practice owners throughout the whole United States, except for four States. And in doing that, I've come to the conclusion that it has to start with you. It really has to start with us looking at ourselves in the mirror and asking ourselves, what kind of owner are we right. I mean, to some extent you're, you're you're and I like to use family analogies a lot.

Speaker 2 (08:38):

I don't know, maybe because I had a pediatric clinic and adult clinic. And so I always saw the dynamics there, but I think your family you know, performance, your children are somewhat of a reflection of you as parents, right? I think your practice is a reflection of you as an owner. So I think you really need to look at yourself. So my first bit of advice is look at yourself and kind of know what your own strengths and weaknesses are. You know, there are four kinds of owners out there, and I think we'll talk about that. So figure out which type of owner you are first, second, when it comes to the interviewing, which is kind of what you were leading to. It's a, it's a five stage hiring process, and I've been, I've been pushing this and teaching on this for, well over a decade.

Speaker 2 (09:17):

Now it's a five phase hiring process and the secret to successful hiring so that you can be correct. 85% of the time with every single candidate you're trying to hire is that you have to get the entire team involved in the hiring process. Your entire team know selectively, right? There's some key individuals, some individuals where you're like, Nope, that's not going to be a fit, right? But for the most part, you need to include everyone in your clinic, in that process. And let me just quickly summarize. So first and foremost, it starts off with phase one, the ad for the ad, you know, you're advertising for somebody you're trying to recruit somebody. Let's say you're looking for a therapist. Let's just pick what everyone's thinking about. Well, here's, here's, here's a tip. Always open your ad with a question, always open your, a question. When you start the ad with a question, it prompts the person to think and reflect on themselves and raises their curiosity.

Speaker 2 (10:06):

You know, here's an example. Let's say you were to say, you know, are you GM's next? You know, senior financial analyst. And then before you even get the next sentence, the person who read that for sense of like, I don't know, maybe I am, maybe I am qualified. Are you the next senior manual therapist who can work in an autonomous work environment? The therapist's coming? I don't know. Maybe I am. So it gets their interest in. So the ad really has to stimulate their interest and then step two, they have to reach in for a phone call, phone screen. Now the phone screen, here's the, here's the death to any interview process. Don't talk about you. Don't talk about the clinic. Don't get into that. Don't sell your clinic. Don't sell yourself. Look, you have to, this is dating one Oh one. You have to be more interested than interesting.

Speaker 2 (10:47):

Now what happens here is once you're demonstrating your higher level of interest, their comfort level goes way up when their comfort level goes way up, their natural persona, their natural personality is going to be there. And that's what you're really striving for in the interview process. You know, phase three, they come into the clinic, they meet the front desk. They, they introduce themselves, give them the application, they fill it out, then let some other member of your team, give them a tour of the clinic. It shows that you're so confident in your staff. You're so confident what you built, that you can leave that potential applicant alone with another staff therapist who can just give up five minutes who are, and now that candidates going to ask, you know, the popular questions you know, how, how do you like the way they run the schedule here, right?

Speaker 2 (11:28):

That's always a difficult question in, in, in hiring or what do you think of the EMR system, right? Encourage that, encourage that outflow and encourage that dialogue with another individual. And then of course you bring them into the interview process. And then finally, you're going to wrap it up and potentially offer them a position, but you have to ask the questions that are getting them to reflect on themselves. And I'll, I'll end with this in the interview and this one of my favorite questions, you know tell me about a time when you last help someone. You know, it's really interesting when people go blank and they pause, you know, I don't want to hear about work. I want to hear about like, when you genuinely tried to help someone, it tells me a lot about the person and how they live their life, because I think striving to serve others and adding more value to other people around us is what's fulfilling. And so I'm really looking for that when I'm hiring. I know I can make somebody a better therapist. I can't always make them a better person.

Speaker 1 (12:19):

Very true. Very true. And thank you so much for outlining that interview process. And hopefully that gives a lot of the entrepreneurs listening, a better idea of maybe how they can do that on their own and kind of make it their own. Now, before we went into that, you said there are four types of PT owners. So let's go back to that. And I want you to let, let, let, let us know what are those four types of PT owners.

Speaker 2 (12:43):

Okay, good. Now this is just based on experience, you know, for the thousands of engagements I've had going all the way back to, you know, I started the business in 2006, but I've been a physical therapist since 92. And so what I see out there and what I've been able to categorize is four types of owners. The first one is the innocent owner. All right. And I think we've all met that person. This is the person who falls into ownership and, you know, they're, they're, they're managing based on census, right? They're like a poll taker, you know? But they're always open to help. They're always willing to get help. They're always willing to seek some advice and some help, but they're the type of person like, yeah, I was in this clinic and the owner just decided to retire and they didn't really want to move on with it.

Speaker 2 (13:25):

They didn't want to get out on the market. You know, they told me a hundred thousand, I could just buy it out. And so, you know, it's less than a Tesla. So I bought the clinic. Right. So, you know, that kind of owner who never really thought about being an owner or whatnot, but they just had an opportunity and they just jumped out and they did it. They didn't give it much thought and then they quickly find out, wow, there's a lot more to this than just treating patients and being great therapist. Right. similar to that owner, you, you run into the caregiver owner and I, I run into this a lot, especially out in the Pacific, on the, on the West coast. You know, Karen you're on the East coast, I'm on the East coast. The average collections per visit in the U S is like 83 to $85 a visit.

Speaker 2 (13:58):

But if you get up in that New Jersey, New York area, you know, it's not happened. And I have clients and stereotypes. Yeah, exactly. It's such a, Oh my gosh, $68 a visit $73 a visit. But if I'm over in Portland, Oregon, 125, $127 a visit. So you get some of these owners that are in these very high reimbursed environments predominantly. And they're what I call the caregiver owner right there, that caregiver. And they go into practice. And they're the one who assumes the perspective of a clinician first, an owner second. And they can be a bit of a martyr. Right. And they tend to run their clinics like, like a democracy, like it's a vote like everybody has equal say, right? And so these are the people that, that call me and, you know, come to find out, they're paying themselves, you know, 45, 55,000. And they've got, you know, therapists two, three years out of school making 85,000, you know?

Speaker 2 (14:52):

And so, but they're always, they're always justifying well, will we put our patients first? And it's all about the patients. And I'm like, so is that to assume that the other 30,000 private practices in the us are not doing that? I mean, really let's, let's just keep this in balance, right? So you really have to, you know, my success with them is I really have to coach them that the minute you open up your clinic, your senior responsibilities to your, your flock, you know, to all the people coming into your clinic, you own that responsibility. You have to be an owner first and clinician second. And then one of the most frustrating owners, number three is the, know it all owner, right? This is the owner has been around a while. They've had some wins, they've had some losses and through their life's experience, they're not really open to a lot of ideas.

Speaker 2 (15:34):

They're not really very open-minded. They got off fixed ideas. They're a little resistant to change. And here they are like, you know, reaching out to us, Hey, Brian, how do you do your social media marketing? Or how do you do your hiring process or what's your, you know pay for performance model and you start going into it and they start, boy, I know that, or I do that, or I don't do that. Or that, you know, this, this know it all kind of thing. Well, you're only going to be as good as you're willing to open up and willing to look at new thoughts and ideas. If you're not willing to look, you're not gonna learn anything. So that's a real shutdown right there. And that's really hard to, to get past that the suite owner, the one that I go for every day, I'm striving for.

Speaker 2 (16:10):

I love it's usually my startups that I've run into that are the go getter owners. These are the ones that, you know, they have an entrepreneurial spirit. They like to manage based on performance. And they're in a continuous pursuit of knowledge. You know, they're just continuing to pursue their knowledge. You know, I always tell people I'm 52. I want to be a better 53 year old. And I was a 52 year old. The only way I know how to do that is listen to podcasts like yours, read books, do audible. I mean, there are so many great people that are adding value to people's lives. You just have to go and get it. You have to take it in. So that go getter that go get her owner. That's the one, that's what we're trying to move everybody into that bucket.

Speaker 1 (16:47):

Okay. So how do we do that? So we're ending 2020. It's been a hell of a year. A lot of unpredictability moving into 2021. I think it's safe to say we're still there still a lot of predictability. So how do we, how do we become that go getter? How do we become successful as that go getter?

Speaker 2 (17:11):

All right. So I was listening to Gary V earlier today, I was watching one of his interviews and he was talking about this exact moment in time. And he said something that I just could not agree with. More, just could not be more in agreement. And I know it's probably going to shock everybody when I say it, but this is an entrepreneur heaven right now. This moment in time, this period in our life and our society in our profession is an entrepreneur. Have it? I mean, this is a 89 degree swimming pool. This is perfect time for you to jump in. And I see it in my business. I mean, we're having our record year. This is our most, most expansive year, yet on record going all the way back to 2006. And I think it's because if you really think about the true essence of an entrepreneur, an entrepreneur like you, Karen like myself, and so many others that we meet, I mean, look, you and I were talking earlier about your practice.

Speaker 2 (18:06):

You have a mobile PT practice. You're doing tele-health, you're willing to color outside the lines. You've always been willing to color outside the lines. If we're going to sit here and go through our profession and continue to call her inside the lines and make every picture like everybody, else's, you're only going to get that. That's all you have available to you, but if you're an entrepreneur and you're a willing to experience anything, and that you got to think about those words, I have to be willing to experience anything. When I sold my practice the first time. So my practice, the first time, two years later, it's tanked the people. I sold it to tanked it. They stopped making their note payment to me. I had a clause in my agreement that if you stop making the no payment, I come back and I buy the clinic back for a dollar.

Speaker 2 (18:48):

I bought the clinic back for a dollar. I bought this product for a dollar. Yup. I was 30 years old, two years later, they tanked it, bought the clinic back for a dollar. I got rid of all of the offices. I kept two. I lost half of the staff. And my wife says, you know what, honey, you can go up there and rescue that clinic. But I am not going to live here in this house in Florida with these two little girls all by myself. That is not what I bargained for. So you can go away for two weeks at a time, but you have to come home for at least three to four days. And then you can go back. And I said, I promise that's what I'll do. I ended up doing that back and forth, back and forth. I turned that clinic around two years after I took that back.

Speaker 2 (19:24):

It became practice of the year practice a year. Why? Because I was willing to experience anything. It had vendors that I owed $150,000 to, it had taxes that hadn't been paid for a year. It was in a middle of a Medicare audit where the patient was seen 141 times a Medicare patient, 141 times. And when Medicare audited them, they failed the audit a hundred percent. I'm like, you didn't even sign your name. Right? And so then I come in and I take it over. And I, I said, I sat on the phone for four hours to finally get to the person whose desk that was running. The Medicare audit, who advanced the R we are an advanced documentation, right? Who are notes were being mailed to mailed to this person in Alabama who was reviewing the notes. Right? And so we found who person was.

Speaker 2 (20:18):

And I said, I'm going to talk to you every single week. I'm getting off this ADR as quick as possible. She says to me, and this really funny Southern accent, and she's like, I've never seen anybody get off an ADR in six months or less. It's going to be at least that, you know, they only pay you one third of your Medicare dollars. I got off that advanced documentation review that Medicare I got off in three months, I was a hundred percent success in three months. And she, she caught us off, but that was me being willing to experience anything in pursuing the knowledge that leads to greater. And that's all that was Karen was, I didn't know anything about that. I didn't know how, what it took to get off an advanced documentation review. I didn't know how I was going to pay those vendors back or rebuild a whole operation with half the staff, but I did what needed to be done.

Speaker 2 (21:00):

And that is what I think really makes an effective leader. Who's really going to be that go getter owner. And the last two P the last three things about that is I'll say I was listening to a audible book by Dean Graziosi. You know, he was mentored by Tony Robbins and he talks about the four CS courage commitment capabilities that naturally grow confidence. I think every successful person who's in this space, who's, who's in this entrepreneurial space business space. When you ask, what is the, what is the one ingredient that is the common denominator to all success? I think they'll all say if you took a tally, the highest thing off the chart would be confidence. It takes confidence, but you're not going to competence. If you don't have courage, like I had to go back and rescue that clinic. If you're not going to be committed to it, like I was going to go the distance, no matter what, if you're not going to have the ability to go to podcasts, read books, go to courses, go to seminars, invest in yourself and get the capabilities to actually do it. I ended up you know, took that clinic back, made it practice the year, two years after I took it back, I took it back in 2009 and it was practiced a year in 2011. So I like to pull from those natural experience. I like to pull from those and share them with everybody. I mean, that's, that's wild. It was a rollercoaster.

Speaker 1 (22:19):

And now, so when you, I have to, I have so many questions. So now when you sold this practice, so you sold it with the contingencies. So you didn't just sell it and be like, okay, I'm selling this and I'm outta here. So why did you not do it that way? Because I think that's an interesting question to ask for people who may be, might be in similar situations.

Speaker 2 (22:40):

Absolutely. I do a lot of mergers and acquisitions and sales. I have three owners right now that I'm working with helping get them, getting them connected to selling their practice and connecting the right people. So at that time, I had spent $115,000 between three different consulting firms and training firms to really train up my management team, train up myself. And that's what I did. And so I invested that money 115,000 to hook a home equity line out of my house. Now you're going to find like, I'm not your typical speaker. You know, when I do my podcast and I'm on other people's podcasts, I believe this Karen, I, and I hope you don't mind. I believe a hundred percent of my DNA that transparency, breeds trust transplants. So I'm willing to just like wear it on my sleeve no matter where it goes. So what happened?

Speaker 2 (23:26):

I manned up this management team. I invested 115,000 into this group. I got back to 2005, 2006, I'm working 15 hours a week. I'm making like $45,000 a month. I'm a thousand miles away living in Florida. I'm living the dream. I'm living the dream. I'm like, okay, I'm going to devote the rest of my life to showing other pet owners how you could be a remote owner and make this happen. A year of that goes by. I get a phone call my management team, the leader up there says, Hey, we want to buy your practice. So I said, all right, let me talk to my wife, Lisa, and I'll get back to you. So I tell my wife, I was like, absolutely not. Why in the world, I am not, we we've worked our whole lives to get to this point. This is, I am not. I said, Lisa, let's think this through. If I call them back and say, we're not interested. What's their next action.

Speaker 1 (24:15):

Find someone else to buy it. They're going to leave. Oh,

Speaker 2 (24:19):

Because they're thinking, well, wait a minute, I'm running this, this $4 million operation, $6 million operation at, why would I stay here? If I don't get a piece that I'm, I'm going to go. So I literally flew up. I wrote on a napkin at dinner, I wrote $6 million. They said, we can buy that. We're going to give you a third up front and we're going to give you no payments on the rest. And I'm like, well, I love these guys. Right? I built them. I groomed them. I put them in a position. I want to see them win. Right. Done deal. Now the nice thing about doing it that way is I already have the skills and knowledge to know how to run the business. So what's my risk. My risk is exactly what happened. They tanked and they crashed it, but I have the skills and knowledge and ability to go back and rescue it.

Speaker 2 (25:00):

Right? So that was the, that was the risk that I had to be willing to accept. What's the upside. Well, two thirds and a note I'm making, you know, fi was a 6% interest on that money. So I'm getting well over my asking price over the course of the time that I'm making, making the payments. It also gives me this guaranteed income, which I made for the two years. And I could go do other things with it. Right. So it was a really good win-win, but the nightmare happened. They defaulted. I had to step in, I had to do. And that goes back to my, you know, my four CS courage commitment capabilities. I had the ability to, I knew myself well enough to go do that. So of course that's what ended up happening. But in 2017 I sold it all again. So it's kind of like in the big scheme of things, it really worked out. But in 2017 I won and done, you know, here's the keys. Thank you. Here's the check. I love it. One and done. So it was a different, it was a different, so I've, I've lived through both experiences. I've lived through both of those opportunities. And that's how it went.

Speaker 1 (25:57):

Yeah. Wow. So I think it's great for people to hear that there are different ways to even sell a practice and, and that it really behooves someone who is in that position to find someone, to help them guide, guide them through that.

Speaker 2 (26:13):

Right. Absolutely. You know, even tiger woods has a coach, right. And he's the best golfer at the time. You know, Tom Brady has a quarterback coach. I think every practice owner needs a coach when you're running the practice. And especially when it comes time to sell your practice. You know, I paid somebody $5,000 just to be a sounding board for me when I sold my practice. Like, because it's an emotional rollercoaster. I said, I don't really need you to do anything. I just need you to pick up the phone when I call, I just need to bounce ideas off of you. And just tell me I'm crazy or tell me I'm being too emotional or tell me. And I just needed somebody to consult with. You know, I just needed a little counselor to help keep me on track. And, and that, that was well worth the $5,000 for me to, to move it on through, you know, I kind of despise the idea of people brokering these deals and taking 6% of somebody's livelihood that they built their whole business for 15 years for like a four month transition.

Speaker 2 (27:01):

I like to just coach people through the sale. I like to help coach them through it, just pay for the time don't pay a percentage of business, but that's me, that's just my opinion on it. You know? I mean, how many of us have sold a house in real estate? And the realtor, you know, blows in and sells a house in 60 days, blows out and walks away with 50 grand. I'm like, I don't care how many website things you did. There's no way I can justify that 50,000, but that's the market. Right. That's how that industry works.

Speaker 1 (27:24):

Right, right. Wow. That's a great story. Thanks for sharing that. And now, before we start to wrap things up what would you like the listeners to take away from what we just spoke about? What are your key discussion points? Well,

Speaker 2 (27:44):

I'll start with what is one of my most favorite books, and if you're going to start there, I think you, if you, if you get this book and you'll listen to it on audible, or you read it, it's, it's the Go-Giver by Bob Burg and John David Mann, that book completely changed my life. And what I got from that book was I got this, that the secret to success is actually giving the secret to success is giving all successful. People will keep their focus on what they're giving and that's what actually gives them their success. You know, I grew up on welfare, you know, my mom raised three boys on her own, you know, government, cheese, bread, butter, food stamps, the whole nine yards, no car. And, you know, I was always of this mentality. Like once I get successful, I'm going to give back. Once I get all my, you know, shelter and security and this and that, I'm going to give back.

Speaker 2 (28:37):

And along this journey, I realized that was completely false. That was completely false, like right here on my computer. I'm talking to you right now on zoom. And I'll just rip off this post-it note and just put it right in front of your camera. I mean, that is what I look at every single day. And it says strive to serve, strive, to serve. And I realized the more I embrace that philosophy of it's about giving more in value than you ever expect in return. I hate a win-win relationship, a win-win relationship implies. I'm going to allow you to win as long as you help me win. I want to see you win in spite of whether I'm winning or not. And I think once I really grasp that, and for those of you with are listening, the more you can focus on surrounding yourself in improving the lives, both personally and professionally of the people you work with. I think that gift of giving is going to pay off tenfold to your community, to your patients, to your employees, to your family and to yourself. That's what I, that's my message on that. That, that's what I've learned. It's been a long haul. It's been a lot of ups and downs, but I'm, I'm convinced that that is what has led to my success and the success of so many other people I've worked with. I've been blessed to work with over my lifetime.

Speaker 1 (29:49):

That's awesome. And now I feel like I'm going to ask you the question I ask everyone, and, but maybe you just answered it. I don't know, but looking at where you are in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self? Let's say right out of, you know, right out of college.

Speaker 2 (30:07):

Oh my gosh. Right out of college. Well, I think the advice I would give my younger self is to be more introspective, you know, be, be a better listener, you know? Don't, don't be so full of your own fixed ideas, you know, be willing to be willing to step down off of that and, and embrace the ideas of others, no matter how foreign they may be to you. So I've looked at it like that. I think that's really changed my perspective over the, over this, especially this last decade, but I've learned to not think of my thoughts. First. I've learned to focus on what's being said to me first and literally take it in, duplicate it to its fullest. Meaning before I communicate back and I'll leave this one phrase and this rattles through my head all the time, whenever I'm in a situation, I'm always reminding myself, don't react, respond, don't react, respond. And so many wild things are happening in our society today. And I think a lot of people respond, respond, respond, and I tend to sit back and take it in a little bit more. And I like to give an approach. I mean, react, react, react. I like to give an appropriate response rather than just be so reactive. So I think that's really changed a lot about me. And that's, that's about all I can say about that.

Speaker 1 (31:38):

Yeah. That's great advice. I mean, great advice. I love the respond, not react and guilty, guilty here of, of reacting maybe too much when I need to just sit back and respond. So it's something I'm going to remember now, where can people find you? If they have questions they want to get in touch with you, they want to learn more about you, the business, all that stuff.

Speaker 2 (32:00):

Oh, great. Well, they can reach out to us. You know, we're on Facebook at Meg business management, you know, that's our handle there and you can follow us on Twitter at Meg business or Instagram at Meg business management as well. Our website is www.megbusiness.com. One of the things we really like to do is we like to, like I said, give and without, so we give free practice assessments. We give free practice stress tests. So if they want to reach in, you know, they can email us@infoatmegbusiness.com, for sure. And for your listeners, you know, special for your listeners for this year, you know, until we hit 20, 21, any service they want to do with us any training they want to do with us, they get a 10% discount. We'll just take 10% off anything they want to do. And that's just for your listeners. Karen, all they have to do is reach into us and say, they heard us on this podcast and my team will just go ahead and honor that anything we can do to add value, I'm happy to do it.

Speaker 1 (32:51):

Awesome. And just so everyone out there listening, of course, we will have all of the links to this one, click away at the podcast website at podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart.com. So if you didn't take everything down, don't worry about it. It's will all be in the resources section under this episode. So Brian, thank you so much for coming on. This was this was wonderful. A lot of great advice, especially as we're winding up the year and kind of moving into 2021. I think this is the perfect info for all of those physical therapy, business owners and entrepreneurs, and intrepreneurs out there. So thank you so much. You're welcome.

Speaker 2 (33:30):

You're welcome. You know, I think we should look into next year and everybody should have a handle on the bottom of their email. I know when my email signature goes out, it always says, expect to do well. And that's one of the things I like to get people just wake out of bed, wake up out of bed, start every day, expecting to do well.

Speaker 1 (33:46):

Awesome. I love it. I may, I may add that as a little sticky note on my refrigerator in the morning. I'll frame it. I love it. Thank you so much for coming on and everyone. Thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

 

 

Nov 23, 2020

On this episode of the Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast, I welcome Dr. Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, OCS, to talk about advocacy efforts in physical therapy. DR. Marko is a Board-Certified Orthopaedic physical therapist & Certified Early Intervention Specialist with over 20 years of experience. She is the owner of Marko Physical Therapy, a private practice in New York City, specializing in orthopedics, adolescents, and pediatrics.

In this episode, we discuss:

-Her path to advocacy

-Federal Bills that are important RIGHT NOW: 9% Cut, Telehealth permanence, Student loan Debt

-State vs. Federal Advocacy 

-Traditional Advocacy vs Armchair Advocacy

-Key Contact: APTA & PPS

-Social Media importance: AMPLIFY, Access, Recognizable, Find others

Resources:

Dr. Marko on Twitter

Dr. Marko on Instagram

Dr. Marko on Facebook

Dr. Marko on LinkedIn

Advocacy is not a Spectator Sport

A big thank you to Net Health for sponsoring this episode! Learn more about the Redoc Patient Portal here. 

More about Dr. Theresa Marko: 

Dr. Theresa Marko, PT, DPT, MS is a Board-Certified Orthopaedic physical therapist & Certified Early Intervention Specialist with over 20 years of experience. She is the owner of Marko Physical Therapy, a private practice in New York City, specializing in orthopedics, adolescents, and pediatrics. She has helped thousands of people to overcome injuries, optimize their movement, and return them to work and sports pain free and better than ever.

When she is not caring for patients, Dr. Marko can be found in legislative offices in Washington, D.C. or Albany, New York. She is passionate about making a change in healthcare and has made advocacy a cornerstone of her practice. For over five years, and hundreds of hours, she has lobbied on behalf of her patients and her profession on topics such as repealing the Medicare cap, reducing student loan debt burden, and lowering copays. She forms public policy priorities as part of the American Physical Therapy Association’s Public Policy & Advocacy Committee, the advisory council for the board of directors of the association. In 2020, she was awarded the prestigious Doreen Frank Legislative Award, given to only one person a year, by the New York Physical Therapy Association for her outstanding advocacy work.

Dr. Marko’s expertise is featured in The Wall Street Journal, PopSugar Fitness, Self, Cosmopolitan, Muscle and Fitness, Business Insider, LiveStrong, and Healthline. She has spoken at Columbia University, Duke University, & Touro College about patient and physical therapy advocacy. She was recently appointed to the editorial board of SpineUniverse as the first and only physical therapist on the board. 

She lives in Brooklyn, NY, with her husband of 13 years and her French Bulldog, Rondo.  

Read the Full Transcript below:

Speaker 1 (00:07):

Welcome to the healthy, wealthy, and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness, and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information. You need to live your best life. Healthy, wealthy, and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only, and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now here's your host, dr. Karen Litzy podcast. I'm your host today's episode

Speaker 2 (00:40):

Is brought to you by net health. So net health has created the reduct patient portal, which provides a secure line of communication between you and your patients. You can use it for video conferencing for tele-health for secure messaging, to respond to non urgent questions from patients. You can share documents and photos, and your patients have 24 seven secure on demand access to their therapy, health information without phone calls and voice messages. If you want to learn more about the Redarc patient portal, contact them at redox that's R E D O c@nethealth.com. Now on to today's episode, we're going to be talking all about advocacy for the profession of physical therapy. And I couldn't think of a better person to have as my guest to talk about advocacy. Then the 2020 Doreen Frank legislative award winner, which is given to only one person a year by the New York physical therapy association for outstanding work in advocacy, dr.

Speaker 2 (01:44):

Theresa Marco, she's a board certified orthopedic physical therapist and certified early intervention specialist with over 20 years of experience. She's the owner of Marco physical therapy, a private practice in New York city, specializing in orthopedics, adolescents, and pediatrics. She has helped thousands of people to overcome injuries, optimize their movement and return them to work in sport pain-free and better than ever when she's not caring for patients. Dr. Marco can be found in the legislative offices in Washington, DC or Albany for over five years and hundreds of hours. She has lobbied on behalf of her patients and the profession on topics such as repealing the Medicare cap, reducing student loan, debt burden, and lowering copays. She forms public policy priorities as part of the AP TA's public policy and advocacy committee. The advisory council for the board of directors, her expertise has been featured in the wall street journal, PopSugar fitness, self Cosmo, muscle, and fitness business, insider live strong and health line.

Speaker 2 (02:45):

She has spoken at Columbia university, Duke university and Touro college, and she was recently appointed to the editorial board of spine universe as the first and only physical therapist on the board. So what are we talk about? So today we're talking about her path to advocacy and how you can get involved and why advocacy is so important. The federal bills that are important right now, which includes a 9% cut to Medicare, very important, call your legislator, tell them not to do that. The difference between state and federal advocacy, how to find your legislators and find out what Theresa calls, armchair advocacy, what key contacts are, social media around advocacy. And so, so much more. So this is a great episode. If you are at all, considering getting involved in advocacy efforts, then you're going to want to listen to this whole thing. Theresa gives a lot of really easy ways to get involved. So thanks to Theresa and everyone enjoy,

Speaker 3 (03:49):

Hey, Theresa, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on. Thanks for having me, Karen. Yeah, absolutely. And today we're going to be talking all about advocacy. This is one of your specialties. So you've been involved in advocacy around the American physical therapy association for the profession of physical therapy. For many years, you're a mentor to many up sort of younger physical therapists and physical therapists. Who've been around for a while, but are just new to advocacy. So why don't you give the listeners a little bit more about why this is one of your passions? Sure. So I didn't start out on this path and this is not something that I thought I would be involved in. There's two main events that kind of propelled me towards this. And, you know, the first is I've been a physical therapist now for about 20 years.

Speaker 3 (04:43):

So I'm older than I look. And what happened was I started to get some hip and back pain that was pretty substantial, you know, MRIs. They wanted me to get an injection. We were talking about surgery and unfortunately the things that I had done to try to rehab myself, didn't get me that much better, but I found dry needling. And I found a physical therapist who became an acupuncturist. Bianca bell, Deni leveraged a death, and she's a master at dry needling. And I loved what she did. And basically, you know, I had a severe spasm in my opterator internist that was killing me and my hip flexor and they were fighting. So I loved the needles. They made such an impact in my life. I can now walk around and not feel that pain in my hip and going down my leg every day.

Speaker 3 (05:28):

And I wanted to use the needles because I loved them so much, but we can't use them in New York. Why? Because it's the law. So that made me upset and I wanted to change the law. And I was really interested in that and why dry needling was such a, you know, variation from state to state, but it's a state law. So that was something I found out then kind of soon after that, or during that time, I also decided to go back and get my transitional DPT. And I took a professional development course. They talked a lot about advocacy and it just dawned on me. And I had an aha moment that basically all the things that I didn't like, the Medicare plan of care, the authorization, the way that you get like six visits than four visits than three visits, you get kicked off with some insurances.

Speaker 3 (06:14):

These things that I had been practicing inside the system for so long that I found so frustrating and so annoying, I realized where because of the law and that they could be changed. And I just decided that one day after taking that class, that it was going to be my mission to try to change these laws, to make the profession better for me, for those generations coming after me for our patients and basically for everyone. And it also dawned on me that legislators in general really don't know what we do. And if no one tells them, they won't know, and they won't make the laws in our favor that will help us our profession and our patients. So, you know, whether anyone likes it or not, we all have to operate in quote unquote, the system. And, you know, that's the government, the democracy, the bureaucracy, the politics. And in order to change that you have to be involved in advocacy. So that's, that's my why. And the other thing that I'd like to add is, you know, what's the alternative to not say anything, to stand by yourself, to get swallowed up by another profession that has a bigger association and a bigger lobby who would be our voice. So if not you then who I love,

Speaker 4 (07:28):

I love it. And I think that's a great reason to become an advocate for the profession. And so often, even when I ask people, why did you get into physical therapy? It's always, you know, you have these aha moments. You have these times in your life where you're like, well, this isn't right. And, and as you dig deeper, you think, Oh, there's actually something I can do about it. I can use my voice. I can speak to my local legislators. I can speak to my, my national or federal legislators. And so let's talk about that. So you've got each state has a state government, and then we obviously have our federal government. So how, as a, as a physical therapist, like, what's the difference? How do we, how do we advocate to each of these groups?

Speaker 3 (08:21):

So when I had to made that decision, that I wanted to become an involved in advocacy, it was tough to figure out at first. And that's one of my other passions is trying to help other people figure out the path because the path is not easy. And these things are very frustrating and confusing. So some things are, remember that. I get asked a lot of questions about art to remember that we have state government and we have federal government. And some of these laws are state laws. And some of these are federal laws. So when you look on the AP TA's website, under advocacy, apa.org, backslash advocacy, it'll show you the federal bills and the things that we're, you know, constantly fighting for now. And then if you go to your state chapter and they should have hopefully an advocacy page on there, on their website, it'll show you the state laws. So dry needling, as I mentioned before, is a state law. Whereas something like making tele-health permanent for the entire country, that's a federal law. So that's kind of, you know, you need to know the difference in like what you want to fight for. Do you want to fight at a federal level? Do you want to fight a state level or do you want to fight it? Both me personally, I think they're intertwined. So I go for both

Speaker 4 (09:33):

And there, but there are some laws that are very specific to the state, right?

Speaker 3 (09:40):

Yes. Like direct access. So that's another one, right? So direct access is super important in the state that you and I live in New York, we have a direct access that allows us 10 visits or 30 days, whichever comes first. So currently on the New York physical therapy associations agenda, we are trying to fight for unrestricted direct access. And that means you don't need a physician's prescription to go see a physical therapist. And again, when we talk about, you know, legislators don't know what we do, patients also don't know what we do. And I found that out and that's become another passion of mine is to get the word out and let society as a whole know what we do. And I repeat myself over and over. No, you don't need the prescription to go see a physical therapist, look up the direct access law in your state, all States now all 50, have some form of direct access. Some are a little bit better than others. But like, I think Texas, right now, you can only go see an evaluation and then you have to get a prescription, but that is a state law. And that does vary from state to state.

Speaker 4 (10:40):

Right? So if you are interested in advocacy, I think the bottom line between state and federal is know what your state is fighting for, and then know what, what the, what you're fighting for at the federal level, which brings me to my next question. And that is what are the federal bills that are important right now, as we speak today is Monday, November 2nd. What is important right now? And FYI, as we all know, tomorrow is tomorrow is election day. But that being said, what are the bills that the AP TA is fighting for right now on the federal level?

Speaker 3 (11:23):

So there are so many bills, but the two, you know, cream of the crop right now are going to be reversing the 9% cut that CMS centers for Medicare services has instilled upon the profession that will start January 1st, 2021. And the reason why this is so important. So this is federal okay. If CMS decides to cut Medicare recipients, 9%, that for some businesses is going to be, make or break, even with the pandemic loss revenue and everything, they might have to close their doors. They might have to stop taking Medicare patients. Medicare patients will have less access, there'll be less clinics. So that's, that's one aspect of it. But here comes the second aspect, you know, of the trickle down possibilities, whatever Medicare does is generally the precedent for what all the other insurances do as well. So the other insurance will probably start to follow suit and there you have cutting reimbursement to our profession.

Speaker 3 (12:20):

Again, more businesses closing all patients, having less places to go, less availability, less access through my years of advocacy, one of the phrases that I've come to realize is barriers to care, you know, access to care. There are all these stumbling blocks that make it hard for people to get the services that they need, you know, instead of seeing physical therapy, because it's difficult, you have to get a prescription or you don't only have, you know, six visits. It is easier to go see a physician and get an opioid prescription, things like that. So certain things drive it. So advocacy is intertwined with all these things. So that 9% cut is really important for that reason. And then the other hot button item right now is tele-health during the pandemic you know, here in New York city where I live, I shut down for a little while.

Speaker 3 (13:10):

I know a lot of people did. I didn't have tele-health set up with my practice at that time, but then I implemented it you know, in late March and many people across the country, physical therapy practices did have tele-health. We were not able to use it before for Medicare recipients, CMS applied a waiver, allowing us to use it. And it ends when they declared the pandemic over. So there we are going backwards again. So one of the things we're fighting for is to make tele-health permanent permanent again, access that people can get in the door and see their physical therapist. And I've used it. I had a patient who she fell down and she hurt her foot in the pool. And she said, Oh, someone at the you know, pool was a, I guess, a personal trainer, no disrespect to them, but they said, Oh, it's not broken. And I took one, look at it. I said, Oh no, your foot's broken. I could just tell. I was like, we need to get you in a boot. You need to go see, you know, get an x-ray. So, you know, tele-health is invaluable to people. They can get any immediately, the minute they hurt themselves. So making tele-health permanent is really important

Speaker 4 (14:18):

Because if we're supposed to be really taking care of the most vulnerable, especially during a COVID pandemic and the most vulnerable are over 65, it only makes sense to allow those people to have tele-health appointments.

Speaker 3 (14:34):

Yeah. I mean, also I used it with the patient the other day. She said that she wasn't feeling too well out of an abundance of caution. She was going to get a COVID test, but she opted for a tele-health session. So we switched from an in-person to a out just like that same time, same, same day. She was able to do that. She just didn't want to put me at risk. And I appreciated her watching out for my safety. So during these times we need that, you know, also people who live in areas where they have to travel far or snow treacherous conditions. Do we want people out in these conditions tele-health could be useful for that? I had a patient who I'm currently treating for her knee. She woke up the other day, her back was an agony. She said, Oh my goodness, my back's hurting.

Speaker 3 (15:18):

I don't know what to do. I said, let's get on a tele-health we did some gentle movements and some stretching. And she said, wow, by the end of it, my back feels much better. Thank you so much. I didn't know that a telehealth session could help that much. And all I did was show her some things to do to give her some advice. So telehealth is so useful in so many situations that I do hope that we can make it permanent. Yes. So do I? Okay. So now we know what federal bill bills are important. Your state bills, obviously you'd have to go on to the, your state PT association. And like you said, before we went on, hopefully there is an advocacy tab within your state physical therapy association website. And that's where you can find out what is on your state legislative docket right now. I mean, we're not going to go through every all 50 States. So for the people listening out there, that's where you would find it. Am I correct? Exactly. Yeah. Okay. All right. Now here's a question. How do we find who our state and federal legislators are? And on that,

Speaker 2 (16:28):

No, we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor and be right back with Theresa's answers. This episode is brought to you by net health, helping you maintain strong relationships with your patients. The redox patient portal provides secure line of communication between you and your patients conduct virtual visits and have follow-up conversations with your patients via secure messaging. When it's convenient for you, patients have 24 seven secure on-demand access to their therapy, health information without phone calls and voice messages, video conferencing for tele-health secure messaging, shared documents and photos and view health information, and appointments to learn more, contact them@redocatnethealth.com.

Speaker 3 (17:16):

So at a federal level a PTA makes it so easy for you. If you go to the APGA action app and that's downloadable in the I store and also Android. And I think you just type in APGA advocacy and the Apple pop-up. And if you're a member or non-member, you can use it. You just, I think if you're a non-member you just type in your address and it will, auto-populate all of your legislators. I actually think it does federal and at the state level too. So one way, but if you want to do it, you know, without that you could also, for federal, you could go to gov track.us, and that would look up your federal legislators, but then at a state level, your state Senator, and your state house or assembly person, you would have to just probably go to the, each one's website and look that up. Like in New York, we have a state assembly and state Senator website that you can search it for. So it's not that hard.

Speaker 4 (18:13):

Okay, awesome. Very easy. So people people understand how simple it is. Just one click or one downloaded app. So now let's talk about the act of advocacy, right? So we talked about why you wanted to be an advocate, how to find those legislators what bills are on the docket? How do we reach out to advocate? How do we do it?

Speaker 3 (18:37):

So the traditional way of advocacy is what we call lobbying. And that would be to go in person to have a meeting face to face with your legislator and ask them to do what's called co-sponsor the bill. That means like, say for the tele-health. If we have a bill number that has been introduced into the Senate or the house you would go, and you would ask them, would your member of Congress sign on to that bill? And then when you get enough co-sponsors you can get a vote. And that's how the bill can get passed into law. So that's traditional. And we can do that both at the federal and the state level. You could go to your state Capitol, like here in New York, it would be Albany. I could go there. So you can do advocacy, AKA lobbying to either one of those, but there's some stumbling blocks with that, that I found people.

Speaker 3 (19:30):

One are a little bit intimidated to do that, too. It can be far three. You have to take off time from work, usually because it's only during weekdays. You know, for me, I live in Brooklyn, Albany's a hike. So it takes a while. So there are some stumbling blocks with that, but that's their traditional way. It is a really fantastic experience. Anybody who wants to can come to Washington DC, the APGA does have a federal advocacy forum every year. It's generally in March this year, it will be in September because of the Centennial, but it's pretty exciting to walk the halls of Congress. And hopefully, you know, the country opened back up and we can have those face to face meetings this year. We did those kinds of meetings, virtual on zoom. It was okay, but I wouldn't say exactly quite the same energy.

Speaker 3 (20:15):

So that's the traditional way. But here comes my favorite part. I call it armchair advocacy. Literally things you can do while you are just sitting, you know, watching a movie, half watching. So there are things you can do where you can you know, go to the action app. You can fill out one of the templates there. The APGA has made for you where you can just send an email. You can go to your legislators own website and send them an email. There. There's always an email me button. You could just donate some money to PT pack to let other go do these things for you, let your money do the talking. But one of my favorite ways would be Twitter, right? So Twitter is free. Your legislator has an account. They're always there. You can follow them. You can like them. You can engage with their tweets.

Speaker 3 (21:05):

Just yesterday here in New York city, you know, speaking of legislators, I heard that mayor, bill de Blasio, he had to stand in line to go to early voting for three hours and he was complained. His back was her. And so I sent him a little tweet saying maybe he needs some physical therapy. So, you know, they're always on Twitter and you can send them a message anytime you want. You could also send them a message asking them to co-sponsor bills. I send out tweets to them doing that all the time. But one of the amazing things that I love about Twitter is you find like-minded individuals, you support them, you amplify their message. And, you know, you can kind of collaborate with people on advocacy there. Some other ways is that your member of Congress generally has virtual town halls these days, and they will post it on Twitter or Facebook usually only a day or two before. So you have to kind of watch out for that, but you can attend the virtual town hall and you can make comments and you can ask questions. I've been to several of my members of Congress town halls, and I asked them questions. I asked them about the 9% cut. That's something I will use support, you know, revoking this 9% cut. Those are the questions that I put in there. So, you know, lots of ways that you can do the armchair advocacy.

Speaker 4 (22:19):

And can you also talk a little bit about the key contact programs? So there's key contact programs. I know for APG as a whole, we're both part of the private practice section. They have key contacts. So what exactly is that and how can someone get involved if they're, if they want?

Speaker 3 (22:39):

Yeah, so AVTA has good point. APGA has key contacts and basically what a key contact is. It sounds a little bit more involved than it is. It just means that you are going to be that liaison to your member of Congress. That you're going to basically try to let them know what it is physical therapy does. And you're going to ask them to co-sponsor our bills. So the ask is, and you can be an apt, a key contact. And if you're a member of the practice,

Speaker 4 (23:06):

Have a

Speaker 3 (23:06):

Practice section, you could be a PPS key contact, and you can be a key contact for both APA and PPS. If you remember PPS. So what you would do is whenever there's a bill coming out, like say, there's going to be something coming out about the 9% cut. You would get an email from the key contact email list or from the PPS key contact email list. And it would just say, send this email and they generally give you a template. You could just copy and paste and you could send them the email on their website. You could send them a tweet. You could call the office. It's basically just asking your member of Congress to support our legislative agenda and our bills. And you would do that, you know, through those pushes. And then in August, we have August recess. When the members of Congress, your Senator and your house person comes home to the district to do district work. And generally we ask you to try to get a meeting with them, either on phone or zoom or in person, you know, before COVID to ask them to co-sponsor some of our bills then. So it's, you know, really a big push in August for those August recess meetings. But throughout the year, it's just a little pushes for the current bills that are going on. So it really doesn't take that much time. And how successful

Speaker 4 (24:19):

Are the, is the key contact program

Speaker 3 (24:22):

It's very successful because the whole point is good point. I forgot to mention this most members of Congress. If I called up your member of Congress, he is not going to be so interested in me because I'm not a constituent, that's the magic word. I don't vote for him. So yeah, he will care what I say, but his ears are not going to perk up as much as if you called because you are a constituent. So that's what key contacts are. They are a voting member in that person's district, AKA constituent. And so then the member of Congress cares more and they will listen more closely to that person. So you become that link, that voting constituent between the physical therapy profession and your member of Congress. And it's been very successful. We've had a lot of people sign on to bills, you know, currently with the 9% cut. I forget how many people signed on recently to a congressional letter, but it was the most that we've ever had. It was I think a couple hundred. And you know, hopefully that's something that we can get overturned and that's because the key contacts reached out to their member of Congress to ask them to sign on to this congressional letter.

Speaker 4 (25:31):

Yeah. So for me, what I'm getting out of this talk is that there's so much happening behind the scenes to advocate for our profession and advocate for our patients. But I think a lot of people don't realize, and if you want to make a change, then you have to let your voice be heard and advocating for the profession, whether you're a key contact or you're sending a template letter that you can easily get on the app is such a great way to get involved. And it doesn't take a lot of time. It doesn't take a lot of money and it's a way to help advocate for the profession and push us forward. So, you know, it sounds cliche, but like you, you want to be the, what is it? You want the change you want to be in the world or something like that, but be the change you want to see in the world. So if you're not in it, then, you know,

Speaker 3 (26:25):

Yes, absolutely. One thing I did want to mention is that APA has something called the advocacy network. If you just Google APJ advocacy network, it will take you to that link sign up for that newsletter, basically, that is part of the advocacy army. And you will get all of the news alerts of what's going on and they will send you, you know, literally a template that you could just fill out. We have this thing called voter voice, which it's just a automatic template. You input your name and address, and you can fill that out and you send a letter to your member of Congress. So sign up for the advocacy network. That way you'll always know what's going on. I am in a lot of Facebook groups and I see people upset and complaining. And I understand I used to feel the exact same way, but they are some uninformed and don't know what's going on. So join the network, know what's going on. You know, I always say one of my things is that I firmly believe the bigger voice, the bigger impact. If we can get a bigger collective voice, we already have a pretty big one, but let's make it louder. You know? And let's, let's make more of an impact and see real change because legislatively is the only real way to make the system different.

Speaker 4 (27:39):

Absolutely. And I was going to say what, you know, as we start to wrap things up, what do you want people? What's the message that you want to leave for the listeners, but I think you just said it, is there anything you want to add to that?

Speaker 3 (27:53):

Yeah. Join the advocacy network. And honestly, I would say, you know, don't be afraid of Twitter and come on Twitter because you can, we can build the army because when other, when you say something on Twitter and then you can amplify each other's message and then it kind of catches on and people, people, you know, get more informed and you can spread the message. So being able to amplify and spread the messages.

Speaker 4 (28:15):

Awesome. And now, before we leave, I'm going to ask you the same question I ask everyone. And that's knowing where you are now in your life and in your career. What advice would you give to yourself as a new grad, fresh out of physical therapy school?

Speaker 3 (28:32):

I would say get good at what you do, your skills of being a PT. That was really important to me at first, but don't forget the professional aspect of it. That was something that I was lacking. And I think that, you know, recently I was also featured in an article for APGA on burnout that just came out last week. And I think that that was one piece I was lacking and being involved professionally in advocacy and not just, you know, becoming a super PT and good at my hands. But having that professional aspect, I think also does help prevent burnout because you, you see that there's a bigger mission and you see that there's something beyond yourself and you're fighting for that bigger mission and you feel part of the community. And I think it's

Speaker 4 (29:16):

Awesome. Great advice now, where can people find you? Where, where are you on Twitter? You mentioned a couple of times and then give us all the info.

Speaker 3 (29:24):

So of course I'm on Twitter. It's Theresa T H E R E S a Marco, M a R K O P T. And then I'm also on Instagram, dr. Theresa Marco, and I have a Facebook page, Marco therapy

Speaker 4 (29:42):

And LinkedIn too. You can find me there. Teresa Barco. Perfect. Very easy, very easy, very easy. So listen, if anyone has any questions, they want clarification on advocacy, Theresa is your go-to person. So I encourage you to follow her on social media to reach out with any questions because she will get back to you. So, Teresa, thank you so much for coming on and giving us such a succinct and informative episode on advocacy. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me and everyone. Thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Speaker 2 (30:19):

Thank you to Teresa. So hopefully now everyone has some good action items that they can add to their list, to become advocates for physical therapy. And of course, thank you to net health for sponsoring today's podcast. They have created the Redarc patient portal, which provides a secure line of communication between you and your patients conduct virtual visits and have follow-up conversations with your patients via secure messaging. When it's convenient for you, patients have 24 seven secure on-demand access to their therapy, health information without phone calls and voice messages to learn more, contact them at redox that's R E D O C at net. Hell.Com.

Speaker 1 (30:59):

Thank you for listening. And please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media.

 

Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitterinstagram  and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest!  Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts

Nov 16, 2020

On this episode of the Healthy, Wealthy and Smart Podcast, I welcome Dr. Gina Kim, PT, DPT to talk about making the move from a physical therapist assistant to a physical therapist. Dr. Gina Kim is the owner of Maitri Physiotherapy, LLC in Central Ohio, the producer and host of The Medical Necessity Podcast, is certified in Integrative Dry Needling, is pursuing certification in MDT, and also uses her 10-year background in Tibetan Buddhism to educate her clients in mindfulness meditation.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • How to transition from a PTA to a PT
  • What is a bridge program for PTAs
  • The benefits of being a non-traditional physical therapy student
  • The ups and downs of physical therapy school while juggling work and life commitments. 
  • And much more! 

Resources: 

Maitri Physiotherapy, LLC

Dr. Gina on LinkedIn

Dr. Gina on Instagram

Dr. Gina on Facebook

A big thank you to Net Health for sponsoring this episode! Learn more about the Redoc Patient Portal here. 

More about Dr. Gina Kim:

Dr. Gina originally wanted to play the trumpet when she grew up. Performance anxiety in high school changed her mind. But what was more worrying was the low back pain that began around that time. She endured that pain for years, but X-rays and muscle relaxers didn’t help. She was fortunate to work with a physical therapist. 

Being free from back pain was so dramatic that she decided that’s what she wanted to do with her life: Help people change their lives by treating pain, especially back pain, without drugs or surgery.

She stated at the bottom as a rehab aide. Next, she earned her license as a Physical Therapist Assistant and worked for years in settings ranging from outpatient orthopedics to acute care to home health. While working as a PTA, she completed her Doctorate through the University of Findlay Weekend College Bridge Program.

Dr. Gina is certified in Integrative Dry Needling, is pursuing certification in MDT, and also uses her 10-year background in Tibetan Buddhism to educate her clients in mindfulness meditation. She is also the producer and host of The Medical Necessity Podcast.

Read the Full Transcript below:

Speaker 1 (00:01):

Hello, Gina. And welcome to the podcast. I'm so happy to have you on,

Speaker 2 (00:06):

Well, I'm happy to be here, Karen.

Speaker 1 (00:08):

So you've got two podcast hosts here. So now you're on the other side of the mic.

Speaker 2 (00:15):

Oh goodness. It's great to be.

Speaker 1 (00:20):

So today we're going to talk about sort of your non-traditional route to becoming a physical therapist. So as, as a lot of people know, or maybe some listeners don't know the physical therapy profession, we're now a doctoring profession. So people are going to school for an undergraduate degree and then usually going right into physical therapy school as their graduate school of choice. But Gina made a definite detour from college through to where she is now as a physical therapist. So I will throw it over to you, Gina, and just kind of tell us your story, because I'm sure it will resonate with a lot of people.

Speaker 2 (01:04):

Oh my goodness. So my bachelor's is in computer science and I won't say how long ago, but let's say windows 95 was the hot new thing. Everybody was getting a computer science degree. I was even, I was even a company's webmaster for a time. So here's the thing, here's the thing. I have zero patience for technology longstanding low back issues. Okay. And especially sitting at a desk job, you know, we all, you know, PTs, you know, now I, now I know well when I was working one particular job, you know, and couldn't take the back pain anymore. And what do I do? I go to see my, go, to see my family doctor and it's x-rays and muscle relaxers, and guess what? Didn't help shocker shocker. And I can't tell you how many years passed between then. And finally, someone I remember I had hired a personal trainer who was himself, a physical therapist, and he said, Oh, you need to see someone who really specializes more in the low back, you know, cause so sky was kind of more on the equipment sales end of things.

Speaker 2 (02:38):

So I found I found my PT and he it's it's so trite, you know, saying he did his magic on me. It's like, I know what he did on me now. But I went from unable to touch my toes. You know, being in pain, you doing, doing that shuffle walk too. Hey, I don't hurt anymore. Yeah. And his reaction was right. And I'm like, wow. And I kind of went away and being kind of in the transitional phase that I was in with a kind of not loving, you know, computer, you know, computer science, you know, that kind of field and also being kind of a gym rat myself. So I was hanging, I was hanging out with with my PT and kind of, you know, kind of doing my own observation hours and doing my due diligence and asking about the education and everything.

Speaker 2 (03:46):

And he said, well, you know, because I was already I think at that point out of my twenties, right. He S he said, well, you should think about getting, becoming a PT assistant. So I looked into that, it's like, okay, I've got my bachelor's let me go to community college now, which, which involved you know, of course there was like a well years waiting period. And, you know, so I'm taking my anatomy and this, that, and the other completed that in 2013 and then worked as a PTA and all the time thinking, you know, I, I just want to go ahead and be able to practice on my own. So then that led to well basically looking at my, looking at my options for grad school and especially being someone by this time, let's see, what was I doing?

Speaker 2 (04:57):

I, I was, I w I'm trying to think about my day as a, as a like during my PT assistant time, I was going to school and then going to work as a rehab aid. And that at night I was going to skate with the Ohio roller girls. It's like, I don't know how I did it. So then I'm thinking if I go into a graduate program in, you know, physical therapy, I there's going to be this age difference at age and experience difference. And I remember I interviewed with one school and the she was, she was the admission secretary. And I won't say which school, but she said, you know, people are working later in life.

Speaker 3 (05:55):

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (05:58):

So I,

Speaker 2 (05:59):

I had heard about the bridge program up at university of Findlay. We can college bridge program. So that required preparation, as far as retaking physics taking, you know, my chemistry series, you know, thank goodness I had already taken exercise fits, but doing, you know, doing the thing so I could apply. And then that I got in, and at the same time, I was still required to work as a PTA as we went up to Finley every other weekend. And when I say we, I say, I met with my cohort from who came in from all across the country. So I had a two hour drive. There were people flying in from Seattle.

Speaker 1 (06:51):

And where is, so is Findlay college in Ohio

Speaker 2 (06:55):

And like colleges in North West.

Speaker 1 (06:59):

Okay. And can you explain a little bit more about what a bridge program is, should that people kind of understand what that means from like a PTA to a PT?

Speaker 2 (07:10):

Sure. So it's a bridge in the sense of you're a PTA and you want to become a PT, here's the thing. You will need your bachelor's degree. Okay. So I had that check you know, plus prerequisites, you know, check. And then since part of the requirement for working was to help with assignments that we would have, you know, and we would be given so we could focus more on the evaluation part of because we were all over the treatment part, you know, and there were people in my class who were already directors of rehab. So I, I was in a very very well-experienced and pretty, pretty smart class. It was, it was pretty intimidating. But also you get that benefit from, you know, all this co-mingling. So then it's basically like any other DPT program. It was three years, you know, with clinicals at the end, and then you take your boards and your, then I became dr. Dr. Gina.

Speaker 1 (08:38):

Right. And so within that, those bridge programs, how many of those programs exist in the United States?

Speaker 2 (08:46):

My understanding is only two, this one and one in Texas whose name is escaping me. Right. But but yeah, and here's the thing too because I always always kind of had in the back of my mind, well, I can always apply to the bridge program. It was, it was kind of like in my, in my back pocket, right. University of Findlay is a private school. So you also have to keep in mind the two wishes that goes with it, right. Plus travel accommodations, and also time off work when you need to, you know, do certain things, you know, such as your, your research and projects and, and all that. Right.

Speaker 1 (09:38):

And when it comes to then your clinical affiliations. So at that point, do you have to leave your PTA job in order to do your clinical evaluation or your clinical placements?

Speaker 2 (09:50):

Yes. And I would say it was a little messy because we were, we were pretty much we work, we were kind of responsible for finding our placements. Right. so yeah, so then you are going off, you know, working someplace now you don't have the income. Okay. So you have, you have that to deal with. And there were Oh, I don't even know how many people in my class had children, some had young children but you know, somehow they managed, you know we got a big heads-up from the class before us, you know, like in our orientation, spoke to us and said, you guys are gonna need a team to help you get through this. You have to rely on each other. You have to rely on your spouses, your partners, your friends, you know, some things as basic as have a food plan. And I'm not even kidding because, you know, between, between working, coming home and studying, you're done, you're done. You know, so my, my husband, you know, I, I started out, you know, like with the food prepping and the making the healthy food and every, by the end, we're eating pizza.

Speaker 1 (11:26):

Yeah. I was going to say, are you going to be, yeah,

Speaker 2 (11:30):

Can you, can you please, you know, pick up, pick up something? Yeah,

Speaker 1 (11:34):

Yeah. It's it's pizza and take out at the end. So I think that brings up a lot of really important considerations for people. So if you are a physical therapist assistant and you are looking to become a physical therapist, we know there are maybe just two bridge programs in the United States. And that there are a lot of considerations that you have to think about before you go into that program. Like when did you do your clinical placements? You kind of can't work at your job as a PTA anymore. Right? Absolutely. And what did you do? What would be your best tips for time management? We know, obviously you just gave away that by the end you're it's pizza and take out now I'm just joking, but what, what are some good tips on, on time management, as you said, you have to study, do research, and you're still working as a PTA.

Speaker 1 (12:33):

My, my time management, I think number one you know, God love him. I, you know, I have cats, I don't have children, you know, on it, honestly, I didn't know how the parents did it. And I think they were even better time managers than I was. So for them, it was, you know, working around, okay, the kids, the kids are in bed or it's before the kids are up. And for me, it was kind of the same thing. Like if I wanted to, you know, spend time with my, with my husband, you know, occasionally it would be up, you know, first thing in the morning because I'm more I'm and it also depends, you know, if you're morning person, evening person, you know, cause I'm like out like a light, you know, if I've got something to do, I'm up at 5:00 AM, no problem.

Speaker 1 (13:32):

And I guess the thing that I'm taking away here, and this, this might be my like naive T here, but I thought like a bridge program going from a PTA to a PT would be, I don't want to say easier than your traditional program, but that, because you're already in the field, that it would be easier. Do you know what I mean? And that's clearly not the case. Like I didn't realize it was three years. I thought, Oh, maybe it's like two years and most of it's clinical. So I think this is really painting a clearer picture for people of like, no, this is still a three-year commitment, three years of financial commitments, perhaps loans, everything else that goes along with it. Was there anything about the bridge program that surprised you? Because I'm surprised number one, that it's three years and that it's, you know, I don't, I don't know what I was thinking, but this was not it. So I'm glad that you're bringing all this up. So is there anything about the program that really surprised you?

Speaker 4 (14:35):

And on that note, we'll take a quick break to hear from our sponsor and be right back with Gina's answer. This episode is brought to you by net health, helping you maintain strong relationships with your patients. The redox patient portal provides secure line of communication between you and your patients conduct virtual visits and have follow-up conversations with your patients via secure messaging. When it's convenient for you, patients have 24 seven secure on-demand access to their therapy, health information without phone calls and voice messages, video conferencing for tele-health secure messaging, shared documents and photos and view health information, and appointments to learn more, contact them@redocatnethealth.com.

Speaker 2 (15:23):

Biggest surprise for me was for a program that had been a browned, as long as it had been that we still had to work around a university and kind of the cap, the system that I think really, really wanted us to be a traditional program, you know in the sense of, for example, I know after us clinicals were starting to be changed to, I think, get people into the field earlier, which was, which was, you know, once again kinda messing with people's employment. So they were, they were serving us, you know, would you prefer, you know, to do like two weeks at the beginning and we're thinking, well, how, how are we going to do that? If you know, our, you know, our clinic, our staff, you know, wherever we're working needs us. Yeah. Not that, not, not, not what you would have expected.

Speaker 2 (16:32):

And yeah, I guess the next question is and you sort of alluded to this when you said you were looking at other physical therapy programs and the woman said, Oh, well, you know, people are working later in life, but let me ask you, which is kind of an interesting thing to say, but what, what do you feel like, or would you feel that you're kind of coming into the doctorate of physical therapy, not coming straight out of high school or straight out of college? What advantage did that give to you? Coming into the field as a newly-minted DPT? I think it gave us a huge boost of confidence because I know that in, in my career, as a PTA, I worked for probably a dozen different PTs seeing how they worked you know, what what they could have done better, you know, what they did great how patients responded, you know, and plus you know, I've, I've got all my treating already, they're already in place. Okay. so I even, I even find it a little hard to imagine. Wow. If I were, if I were coming out of a traditional program and I've heard this spoken about a little bit of, you know, just trying to build that confidence in that first year. Well, I came out and it was kind of like, well, you know, I just had evaluations to what I'm doing.

Speaker 1 (18:20):

And when, let me ask you this, when you were a physical therapist assistant, what was your experience like as a physical therapist?

Speaker 2 (18:31):

It really depended on the PT. A lot of them, I felt had a lot of trust in me because they, you know, they saw that, you know, their patients were getting results and I had good rapport with them and, and so forth. Had a few, it became, it became a little more interesting once I was in school. Because I know there was, there was one particular person who he was, he was pretty fresh out of school and he seemed to want to challenge me a lot, like, you know, kind of like, you know, pop quizzes and, you know, things like that. It seemed a little light gatekeeping a little bit. But I mean, that was, you know, that was minor compared to, you know, the other the other PTs that I worked with.

Speaker 1 (19:33):

Yeah. Well, that's interesting. I know, cause I, I, I often wonder what that experience is like. And then, so for you moving from the physical therapist assistant to the physical therapist was all about having a little more autonomy and agency over your career, is that right? Absolutely. Yeah. And when you graduated, what were your, how did you feel then? So, you know, cause it's, it's, it was a difficult to make that transition. Did you kind of fall back into old habits after you graduated? Or was it more like I got this, I'm doing it,

Speaker 2 (20:10):

You know, I, I would think it, it really felt like I was ready for this. Now, the part that I didn't expect, and I think this was from my experiences in my clinical rotations as a PTA and then do it in doing it again as a PT and also couple of affiliations. They were kind of more in kinda more of those mill like settings. So I didn't go into PT school thinking I'm going to become a owner, but once I was finished, I was adamant that I needed to create my own career.

Speaker 1 (20:57):

And you knew that. So when did you graduate from physical therapy school? Couldn't get your DPT.

Speaker 2 (21:03):

So let's grow graduation was end of 2018. Yeah. And then test it for my boards in what was wow. May how, sorry, how soon we

Speaker 1 (21:20):

Forget. I know you seem to have blocked that out.

Speaker 2 (21:22):

Yeah. I'm sorry. April, April. Okay.

Speaker 1 (21:25):

Okay. So, so it sounds like the experience that you have previously really set you up to then say, I'm ready to, to become that entrepreneur. I'm ready to kind of do this.

Speaker 2 (21:39):

I think as far as mindset. Yeah. Still in our, our business class was kind of the classic. Okay. Let's write a business plan about how to build a brick and mortar clinic. So then the business knowledge some of, some of it I, you know, took away from the free resources on the AP TA website but being a solo clinician and cash based I felt that I needed to look for kind of more support, you know, as far as networking and, and all that. And because I was dealing with different issues than say a larger clinic with, you know, accepting insurance and several therapists and whatnot. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (22:38):

Right. So, I mean, and of course, like moving on through the business, that's a whole other discussion, which, you know, maybe one day we will have on here as well. But what I think it's important to note is that, you know, you mentioned it briefly is the mindset part of it. You're like, Oh, I had the mindset part and kind of skimmed over that. But that is so important because like I said, when I graduated from PT school, no way in hell, did I ever think I'd be able to own my own business? Just wasn't even on my radar, you know? So what advice would you give to, I guess, newer, newer grads, whether they're traditional or non-traditional like yourself who are thinking about starting their own practice

Speaker 2 (23:25):

To find people in and hang out with people who, who were doing what you would like to be doing, you know? Yeah, there were already folks in my class who, you know, they were, they were having their plans in place. Like one of them was going to be, become a partner in a clinic. You know, I mentioned several were directors of rehab someplace, another guy he already had, you know, his his athlete and sports training practice up. I mean, he was, I mean, he was running that well, he was doing everything else.

Speaker 1 (24:07):

Yeah. So it seems, I think what's so interesting is, is that sort of non-traditional path to physical therapy. It seems like it, you know, because people have already gone through so many life experiences or maybe different jobs and they feel like, boy, they're really ready to be in the space that they're in and own it. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 2 (24:34):

And I definitely, I definitely know that confidence was there. And even, and at the same time, I know of a few classmates, they were already looking at residencies, you know, they were looking at specialization.

Speaker 1 (24:54):

Yeah. So, I mean, I, so I think to my big takeaway here is to all of the more traditional PTs out there who maybe have a non-traditional student or a physical therapist in their class, or who are in class with people who may be were our, our physical therapists assistants and, and going for that DPT is to make sure that you seek them out and learn from them because they've got these life experiences that when you're 21 and 22, you just don't have, you know, and so seek those people out in your class and, and definitely learn more about them and learn where they're from and where they want to go. Because I think that as a, not as a traditional student, and when I say traditional, I mean, you know, you came out of high school, went to college and now you're in PT school is sort of straight linear track. That there's so much more that the non-traditional student can can offer because you've got some more life experiences under your belt. Absolutely.

Speaker 2 (26:05):

Let me add another point to that. As far as the confidence part, because especially working with older clients, they seem to have a little bit more comfort working with someone my age.

Speaker 1 (26:23):

Mm. Yeah. And yeah, that makes sense. Sometimes kind

Speaker 2 (26:29):

Of already assumed that I was a PT

Speaker 1 (26:33):

Working there even as you were a physical therapist assistant.

Speaker 2 (26:41):

Yeah. As I said, I was a student

Speaker 1 (26:44):

Yo, as you were a student. Yeah. Oh, that's interesting. That's interesting. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I didn't even think about that. So, so the, the confidence, not just that you exude, but that, that the patients can kind of feel it and yeah, that's interesting.

Speaker 2 (27:01):

Yeah. And also I think the the ability to quickly develop rapport and all those, all those good skills, you know, like listening and responding and, and hearing and seeing how people are presenting instead of, you know, being, you know, well, you know, I'm still learning these basic you know, I have to learn all the things I, I have to learn how to evaluate, you know, but also how to treat and progress and this, that, and the other I've already, I've already got the, you know, I'm already thinking ahead, you know, to what their course of treatment is going to look like, you know, because I've seen it. Right.

Speaker 1 (27:47):

Yeah. You've got the experience. Yeah. Yeah. And experience, as we know, is, is so important. So, so let me ask you as we start to wrap things up here. So I gave you what my biggest takeaway was, what's your biggest takeaway and what would you like the listeners to take away from, from our discussion of your journey of this, of being a non-traditional PT?

Speaker 2 (28:10):

My biggest takeaway. So you have the benefit of the non-traditional experience, you know, meeting all these people with different, you know, different knowledge bases and certifications and things like that. Also at the same time, there's a, there's a challenge to doing things such as, you know, say going to a conference, you know, like CSM, because you're, you have to think about, you're going to be in school when a lot of these events happen. So it's like you, if you really, really want to go, you have to plan, you have to make plans for it and, and, you know, get, get an excused absence, you know, for want of a better word. So that, that can really, I, I think you need to then really, really work on your networking when you're finished. I think because of that. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (29:20):

Yeah. That may be aware of that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. And then, you know, I'll ask you the same question I ask everyone, and that's knowing where you are now in your life and in your career. What advice would you give to your younger self? And let's not say when you graduated PT school. Cause that was like a year ago. So let's maybe go back little bit more like maybe when you graduated undergrad or something. Yeah.

Speaker 2 (29:45):

Back in the day. Not, not everyone who gives you advice knows what they're talking about.

Speaker 1 (29:58):

True story. Yes.

Speaker 2 (30:00):

Because that's how I ended up in computer science, which was not the right career path for you, which was not the right career path. Right? Yeah. So yeah, the thing, the thing that I wish I would have done a lot more of was extracurricular, so I could have, could have known myself a whole lot better. That's great. But to make, yeah. To make make a better guided choice.

Speaker 1 (30:29):

Mm great advice now, Gina, where can people find you? So first of all, talk about your podcast and then where can people find you?

Speaker 2 (30:36):

I would be happy to, so I am the producer and host of the medical necessity podcast where I help guide people through the flood of medical information out there. I love it. Yeah. Available on wherever you get your podcasts, pod, bean, Spotify iHeart radio at iTunes and my business is called my tree physio-therapy LLC. You can find me@maitri.physio. And I practice in Ohio. I'm licensed in Ohio. I bring a world-class world-class physical therapy to your home or via tele health. So you can, you can find me there and I would love to treat that

Speaker 1 (31:36):

Awesome. Well, we will have all of the links to everything at the show notes at podcast out healthy, wealthy, smart.com. So if you didn't, weren't taking notes, don't worry. One click will get you to everything, including your website and your podcast and social media as well. Jean has got a great Instagram page where she shares a lot of great free information with everyone. So you'll definitely want to check out her Instagram, what's your Instagram handle

Speaker 2 (32:06):

At medical underlying necessity.

Speaker 1 (32:09):

Awesome. So Gina, thank you so much for coming on. This was great. And I think it gives people a lot to think about, especially those physical therapist assistants out there who may be there on the edge, maybe they're thinking, Hmm. Do I want to go on? So I think you gave a lot of great information, a lot of great insights, so I appreciate it.

Speaker 2 (32:30):

Well, thank you. And I hope absolutely anyone who has questions about this bridge program, feel free to reach out to me.

Speaker 1 (32:39):

Awesome. Thank you so much. And everyone who's listening. Thank you so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitterinstagram  and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest!  Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts

 

Nov 5, 2020

On this episode of the Healthy, Wealthy and Smart Podcast, I welcome Dr. Sarah Smith, PT, DPT to discuss how women can cultivate their core confidence. Dr. Sara Smith specializes in assisting female leaders, healers & creatives re-activate their Core Confidence. Specifically, women who wear many hats and desire to leave a legacy with less burnout and greater personal joy. 

In this episode, we discuss:

 

-How women focus attention on external approval and achievements/external successes.

 

-Why we need to be connected, aware and in tune with our pelvis.

 

-Messages the pelvis (and body) may be giving us that we are missing

 

-Core Confidence-what it is. why it is so important

 

-How does reducing urgency in daily life payoff- how the mental affects the physical body.

 

-How mental and spiritual Core Confidence and awareness of our Core can affect physical core strength.

 

Resources: 

 

Dr. Sarah’s Facebook

 

Dr. Sarah’s Instagram

 

Dr. Sarah’s LinkedIN

 

Activate Your Core Confidence Workbook

 

Discover Your Joy Coaching Session w/ Dr. Sarah

 

A big thank you to Net Health for sponsoring this episode! Learn more about the Redoc Patient Portal here. 

 

More Information about Dr. Smith:

Dr. Sara Smith specializes in assisting female leaders, healers & creatives re-activate their Core Confidence. Specifically women who wear many hats and desire to leave a legacy with less burnout and greater personal joy. 

Her unique approach focuses on connecting women back to their Core which holds authenticity, choice and immediate solutions so one can thrive both personally and professionally in all life situations.

This activation is vital so that women leading their families, communities and companies can stay fully present in all situations in order to

  • Communicate & interact authentically and calmly
  • Finally feel their private life & success matches their professional success with greater freedom, confidence, peace, focus and direction.
  • Flow through daily tasks and commitments with more focus, ease and an organized plan
  • Improve physical strength & major health gains
  • Live Wild & Bright- meaning! connected to our true, authentic, soul calling

She has blended her professional expertise as a Doctor of Physical Therapy- specializing in Women’s Health and Chronic Pain Management, Certified Yoga Instructor & Certified Wellness & Life Coach. With every personal & group experience Dr. Sara Smith offers, she is dedicated to the goal of assisting women of all ages to step back into their Core Confidence.

 

Read the Full Transcript below:

Speaker 1 (00:01):

Hey, Sarah, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on,

Speaker 2 (00:04):

Thank you so much for having me, dr. Litzy. It's glad to be here.

Speaker 1 (00:08):

Yeah. And so obviously I'm a physical therapist as are you, you have specialized in pelvic health and women's health, and then you have also kind of made that transition for at least part of your career into coaching, mainly other women from around the world. So before we get into the meat of the interview, I would love for you to share with the audience a little bit about your sort of career trajectory.

Speaker 2 (00:40):

Absolutely. Yes. So it's a, it's a little professional and it's a little personal, so it's the story tends to track with a little bit of both. I also went and got my yoga certification and that was actually the first thing that I did after physical therapy, you know, from, from physical therapy. A lot of that came because you know, in our profession we have a high turnaround and burnout ratio there at times. And I was a chronic fixer and helper and I was good at what I was doing to the point where I, you know, anybody came in and I was ready to, you know, help them with their issue. And so I went to my first yoga class, really just to chill myself out, get a little bit grounded and get, get real. And then from there it really almost overnight, it, it drastically shifted the way I was showing up and treating my patients at the time.

Speaker 2 (01:42):

I realized that kind of less was more, I realized that it was more important for me to listen instead of coming in with a plan and, you know, my own action sheet and really meeting people where, where we were, I think I was always empathetic, but it, it really enhanced that. And on top of that, I stopped getting sick. I was averaging, you know, a sinus infection once a month and just burned out already and young because I didn't want to, you know, you didn't want to fail having that syndrome. So really yoga kind of came first and then that solidified me for a while. I kept into the physical therapy world. I've always lived in rural areas in Virginia and I was on the Eastern shore of Virginia and I'm an only child. So I do like to be the only one doing something I like to be a little special.

Speaker 2 (02:40):

And, and so I realized nobody in the area was doing pelvic floor work. I had in all of my internships had some sort of connection to pelvic floor and women's health work. So I, I learned about it. I kind of knew about it. I didn't know if that was something that I wanted to get into. But I knew that it was a niche in the area that I was in. And so it was when I got into pelvic floor physical therapy work that I really professionally started to see this and, and chronic pain management has always been something that I just love helping people that have been to lots of therapists, physical therapists, and in there need assistance with that. But I was just seeing this mind body connection. I was seeing how with all of these individuals, and for some reason, I just happened to be working with a lot of leaders, professionals, directors, CEOs, you know, it just was kind of happening that way.

Speaker 2 (03:41):

Even some like rockstars lawyers, I don't know, Olympic swimmers, all these different people and stress was also happening mentally. You know, there were things going on either in their personal life or their professional life. That just seemed to be kind of also coming into what I was noticing in their physical body. So I was learning about it personally and just my own interest. And then I also was seeing it professionally and I was seeing when I started incorporating some of the yoga, you know, some of the mindfulness based practices and stress management breathing that I was getting better results. And I just am a result junkie. You know, I'm not interested in putting a patch on something. I want somebody to come back to me six or seven or 10 years later and be like, I'm still using what you did. So there was that.

Speaker 2 (04:34):

And then on top of that what I got into pelvic floor therapy, my started having children and my, our, our first child who's now seven was we found out at a very young age that he had an ultra rare genetic mutation. So it was de Novo. It wasn't for my husband or myself and severe speech apraxia. So I started getting, you know, deep into the world of executive functioning and,ureally learning more and more about kind of, I always loved the nervous system, but, you know, I became even more fascinated with how to manage that,uand, and work with it. And so that, those two things kind of happening simultaneously are what brought me into, into coaching. Umnd specifically working with female leaders, hecause that, I don't know, that's just like a deep within personal mission is I feel like women are here to make a major contribution.

Speaker 2 (05:42):

I feel like the time, the time is ripe, the time is now. But we've learned and write in it in a great way. We've learned from a very male dominated structure,uwhich doesn't always work for women. And,uit can, it definitely works. It's not that it's, you know, not working, but there, there are some things that need to slightly shift and,uI'm just, I really want to be able to contribute to women, being able to be in these leadership roles and do it without as much burnout do it without as much self-sacrificing,ufamily sacrificing community sacrificing. Uso yeah.

Speaker 1 (06:32):

Awesome. Well, thanks for that. Thanks for kind of letting the listeners get a little bit deeper into kind of who you are and why you do what you do, because it all leads into our discussion today. And it's, it's really all about as you say, why we need to be connected, why we need to be aware and in tune with our pelvis. So as a physical therapist, we can all agree that yes, we need to be in tune with that area. Everyone has a pelvis, everyone has that musculature and, and the functions of but coming from, I think your unique perspective of both physical therapist and coach and looking really beyond just the pelvic floor, which we should all be doing anyway. So, so give us your take on why we need to be connected.

Speaker 2 (07:25):

Yeah. You know, I've seen in, in the realm of success, leadership, entrepreneurship anybody who's, who's type a you know, th there's a lot of overthinking long to do lists. There's a lot of being up in our head, you know, w where do we go next? And I say, we, because this, you know, I've, you're only a great teacher if you've been there yourself, right. And, and are still in the depths of it. And so, you know, we th there's lots, that's constantly swirling up in our head, but we also know, and, and, you know, a variety of different resource research sources have shown us this, that we can't access all of the solutions to our biggest professional, personal life challenges. If we're in constant thinking mode all day long, not to mention, you know, roughly 80% of all thoughts are habitually negative, which is not very helpful for solving problems. And so the reason that I am so drawn to what I call, you know, well, it's not just me calling it a core confidence and getting people specifically into their pelvis and back into their body is, is reducing the overthinking so that we can access again, creativity, focus, productivity, you know, improved, sleep, stress, relieving, you know, hormone responses. You know, I could, I could go on and on.

Speaker 1 (09:01):

Yeah. And so you brought up the, the the words, core confidence. So can you explain what, what does that mean? Because I have a feeling it may mean a couple of different things to a couple of different people, but in the work that you do in helping people become more productive, improve their leadership, improve their life, what does that, what does core confidence?

Speaker 2 (09:28):

Yeah. I love how you said that, you know, it means something to, there's lots of different ways to describe it in there. There really is. You know, to me, and also the, the clients that I've worked with for many, many years now, it means freedom. It means expansiveness. It means seeking joy. It means effectively, you know, being effective at what they do. Meanings means also having more energy core confidence really is being able to go within yourself and access that wellspring of inner wisdom really access your, your yes or no. And a lot of times, and this is, this is actually comes from, from those in the research field. Core confidence also is a mixture of self-efficacy of hope of optimism and resilience. External confidence. I don't think we should be talking about core confidence without also touching on external confidence and external confidence is what the majority of us learn to, to seek after.

Speaker 2 (10:43):

And we're constantly seeking after it. The external confidence is, you know, does dr. [inaudible] Like me, or, you know, what I should be doing right now, or, you know, these are the, the, the dreams that, that others are doing. So this marketing strategy has worked for them. This app has worked for them, let me do this, let me, you know, follow this meal plan. And so, you know, we're constantly as humans chasing others, things that have worked for them. And, and we're very often, again, not realizing we're up in our head and we're not really checking in with the, the little voice that's like, that's kind of a waste of time.

Speaker 1 (11:32):

Yeah, totally. I, I always find that it's so much easier to look for that external validation and get our confidence from that external validation, then what we do than what we think we are doing. Does that make sense? Solutely yeah, so I, I mean, and, and we're all human and all humans fall into that trap. So can you kind of give us an example of how you might work with someone to help develop this core confidence and help to bring in more joy and help get them a little more grounded into themselves? Are there any sort of exercises or things that you do with people that you can give this as an example? Yeah,

Speaker 2 (12:15):

That's a, that's a great you know, I I'd say one of the main tips that I, that is probably ended up being my, my signature Sarah move,uhas been really, you know, so listening to somebody, I really love deep listening. I mean, I think when you start listening to someone, at least for me, I don't know this is, this is, h gift that I have is I start reading between the lines. Umnd actually I'm kind of diverting for a moment. A lot of times when I work with people, I don't do it over zoom. We don't do video. Umecause when you look somebody in the eye, sometimes it's hard to be a hundred percent truthful, you know, or again, you kind of fall into the, the external competence trap. Umnd so we do it all over the phone or, you know, with the video off so that I can really deeply listen.

Speaker 2 (13:09):

And what I'll do is, you know, if there's a belief in there for example, I was working with somebody the other day and she shared, you know, while we were talking about her personal life. And and she was like, you know, if I kind of keep having these, these, if I close the door on this relationship, I'm probably actually going to have to do a lot of hard work on myself to pick up the pieces. And what I asked her was, well, well, is that true? That working on yourself has to be hard.

Speaker 1 (13:47):

And when

Speaker 2 (13:47):

We, I call it, like, we've got to, we've got to go. I like going down the rabbit hole with somebody of like, really being like, why, why are we fearful about this? Like, let's, let's talk about it. Let's get to the root and let's shine the light on what, what the narrative is with this overthinking piece. Once we shine the light on it, half of the work is done because we've brought in awareness. And whenever you bring in awareness works time.

Speaker 1 (14:18):

Absolutely. Yeah. And it's, it's, you know, that you're right. Being able to listen and listen well is a gift, but it's also something luckily that can be practiced and can be worked upon as physical therapists. I think a lot of us, a lot of us are pretty good at listening. But when you work with, like you said, that chronic pain population, you really get, I think, a lot more in tune to what the person is saying. And you also learn how to ask those questions to draw out more thoughts.

Speaker 2 (14:54):

Absolutely. Yes. And here's the interesting thing that I've found. Okay. and, and I, a lot of this comes from like archetypes and youngian psychology is we have different aspects of our, of our psyche and of our personalities. Right. And a lot of times what you'll find is we learn these skills, we practice these skills professionally, but when it comes to the, behind the scenes for ourselves, we're almost like different people. I had a client the other day, you know, she is a director and has, has a large, very well-known board behind her. And and she's like, you know, if the board was to be a fly on the wall and kind of experience my personal life, they they'd be like what, you're not even the same person. Because suddenly things become matters of the heart. They're no longer again, the, the head, you know, so professionally relating people through this very well yet, we're not really sometimes having that, that advisor, that best friend, that we didn't even know we needed behind the scenes to help us hash out our own stumbling blocks. And that's where I think in, in leadership and entrepreneurship and being a CEO of, you know, your business and your life and trying to be healthy, wealthy, and smart, I think that's, we need that now.

Speaker 1 (16:22):

And why do you think that's so hard

Speaker 2 (16:24):

To,

Speaker 1 (16:27):

To confide in others of, you know, it's, it's a lot easier to say, Oh, you know, I, I didn't have any new patients this month. So, you know, I really w what do you think, how can I help? How can I get more patients? That's easy, right. To talk about our business and, and to talk about our our professional life. But why do you think it's so hard for people to confide in others on a more personal level?

Speaker 2 (16:55):

Hmm. I love this question. I really love it. Of course, I'm sure it's very multifactorial. I find that I don't, you know, I don't have any research on this, but I find that if you start looking back even into it and not like massively, but you start looking back into childhood, you know, where a lot of habitual patterns are formed and thought patterns are formed. A lot of times you'll see, you'll see trends there, but, you know, one vein of research shows that about half of all CEOs, those at the top are experiencing loneliness and loneliness in the sense that, you know, there has to be a level of healthy ego and confidence, right? B core confidence or confidence in order to want to succeed. You know, all sorts of people are teaching us out there and showing us that, you know, you gotta have some grit, you gotta have some resiliency if you wanna play this game.

Speaker 2 (18:01):

And it is a game. And so, you know, there there's factors of like, you can't trust everyone, right. If you have team members underneath of you traditionally that's really changing, I think, but traditionally we're taught, you know, you don't mix business and personal life. You don't do that. That's a no, no. Now you'll see that changing. And that's continuing to change because you know, many psychologists are beginning to study really resiliency and entrepreneurship and, and understanding more specifically how they're tied together, because it's, th that's really just a new field of, of understanding. He can't trust people, you know, and I think many have experienced, again, maybe it was in the past or more recently you know, you do share some of those personal moments and it might come back to bite you or suddenly the, the inner critic and other thought thought in the brain comes up and says, Ooh, that was not a good idea. You're probably that is going to backfire. You know, that could make you look weak. So I think it's very multifactorial.

Speaker 1 (19:16):

And I guess this is kind of where having someone, you know, outside of your direct business to have as a resource and to help you as a coach I guess I would, I'm assuming that that's where coaching comes into play, because you can kind of be that person to sort of help with the personal and the professional, because I can only assume that they're closely related.

Speaker 2 (19:44):

Right. They are way more closely related than people realize. And your professional self that like the way you act professionally is often different than the way you act and your personal life. Like, can you, can you relate to that?

Speaker 1 (20:02):

Yeah, of course. Okay.

Speaker 2 (20:05):

And so, you know, cause I, I, yeah, same thing for me too, but I'm always interested, you know, in what, what somebody, his answer would be.

Speaker 1 (20:12):

Yeah, no, there's, there's no question that, that we're a little different in our personal life than in our professional life. And, you know, it's funny to say, because I was having thoughts around that yesterday. Because you know, we're all human, right? Every once in a while, like we screw something up, we say something we didn't want to say we regretted afterwards. And yet you're vilified for being a human being. You're vilified for saying something that, yeah, like maybe what you said, wasn't the best thing to say, but you take ownership over it. You say, Hey, listen. Like, yeah. I mean, I, you know, I let my emotions get the best of me, which never ever happens in my professional life. Right. Right. In my professional life never happens. And yet all of a sudden you're demoted in the eyes of so many people, but all you did was you were just a human being and you said something, or you wrote something that you later like, ah, I can't believe I did that. And because it's not a podcast, we can't go back and edit it out. So I think that there is this, this weird kind of, if you start to melt the two together, you're going to be screwed.

Speaker 2 (21:33):

Yeah. It's a way or another, it's a belief. Absolutely. And I think that we need guidance to blend them appropriately, you know, because the answer is not, well, you'll see this as a marketing strategy now. Right. Where it's like, okay, show the behind the scenes and show yourself and be yourself and dah, dah, dah. Well, I think that there's always a, a middle ground to all of that, that we need to be aiming for. And again, it has to feel true to you, you know, like you have to get back into a state of checking in with yourself and not checking in with the head and the thoughts of like, okay, is this an alignment for me? And so, you know, in a lot of cases when you're blood, when you're, I like drawing on the professional self, like let's say, I might say, okay, what would professional dr.

Speaker 2 (22:23):

Litzy do when we're talking about something personal, because that's how the, the, the two aspects of you can really start blending together and start working together as a team and be like an integrated, whole healthy, beautiful person, right. Uwho can stay true to your individual values? You know, we get to like explore what those individual values are and being true to those,uin, in order to make it work for us, I've ever really cool example of a client who,ushe's in the hospital system and I'm pretty high up. And she was offered. We had been working for, I don't know, probably three to six months or something we'd been, she had been, and we were mostly working in the personal field, you know, but of course the professional always, always blends in. And she had been offered this incredible opportunity to lead this team.

Speaker 2 (23:25):

This was just in addition to her goals that she already professionally had for the year. And as she sat with that, and as I sat with that with her, she realized, you know, if this had been last year, I would have said yes to that. And I'm very flattered, but the truth is, is if I say yes to that, then all that I'm doing to take care of myself so that I can show up to meet my professional goals is actually going to be derailed. And so at that moment, it wasn't in alignment for her. And what was even better about that was then she was able to go to her boss and to communicate that I call it like, you know, communicating from the core, but communicate that not from up in the head like, Oh, no, I wonder what I'm doing. I hope, you know, hope I'm not really screwing this up, communicating it with authenticity, with crowdedness, with strength, right. With empowerment. And, you know, her superior was like best decision you ever made. I really appreciate it. Really championed to her now, how awesome would that be if we could have more of that in our small businesses and in all of our workplaces and all of our organizations,

Speaker 1 (24:43):

I mean, that's an ideal situation when the ideal situation, but I think it's hard when you're constantly kind of seeking out success and seeking to be quote unquote the best at what you do and to get that recognition and to build your business and to make more money. So you can live the lifestyle that you want to live and provide for your family or your friends or whomever is in your, your world. But how does, how does making these decisions, like you said, these sort of more grounded decisions where, where they are emotional versus making these decisions as strictly like pros and cons, like an intellectual pro and con list, you know what I mean? So how do you, how do you coach people in that tug of war?

Speaker 2 (25:41):

I hope I can answer the question of how do you coach people, because sometimes you just have to see it, you know, and experience it. But you know if you look, if you talk to anyone in the financial world, the stock market is emotional emotions drive everything. That's true. Right. And you know, if we're the faster, we're aware of that, the more tapped in that, that we're going to be. And so that's actually, what's happening is a, is a lot of times where we're making these leadership decisions, we're making these personal decisions when we're in a state of emotion. And often when we're, you know, emotions are coming from thoughts, right. You know, you know, the, the, the little wheel starts going and then suddenly, you know, we have these emotions with us. A lot of times you don't even know what the sensation is in the body, because we're, again, we're kind of more of in the head.

Speaker 2 (26:36):

And so when you can access, and what I do is often just really helping somebody with very challenging. Like I prefer the challenging situations, you know, where it's like, okay, why do I keep getting into this relationship? Why do I keep not, you know, being able to climb the ladder? Why is it I can't get, get know fit in the self-care pieces of it. And when we get to the root of it, a lot of times it's because things are happening in an emotional realm. And we've got to be aware of that, go down the rabbit hole of the actual, like fear and worry. And why, like, why are we responding the way we're responding? Why are we doing that? And then once you get to that, then you can actually get to the clarity piece where you get the clouds and the, you know, the fog out from your face. Right. You can go, okay, pro this con this dah, dah, dah, dah. Okay. Now I've got my marching orders go. And I, I don't know about you, but I like marching orders. I like to know the next step.

Speaker 1 (27:37):

Yeah, absolutely. And, and I think, you know, a lot of people who are in leadership positions or who are going out to be that entrepreneur, their dreams, like you are a type a person. I think you are a lot of just pros and cons. But I do think that the emotional segment of things does have to come into play because if your pros and cons from a very sort of robotic sense is, is okay, I guess, but then how is it going to make you feel, how is it going to affect your life? Are you going to be happy with your decision? Are you doing something because you feel pressure to do it because you have to do it, quote unquote. So I think being able to tap into that core confidence in that and your core values in order to help you make decisions is important. So it's like, I don't want to be on either pole, like purely emotional, purely cerebral, but you want to have, you want to be able to kind of get in there and go down that rabbit hole, which is not easy and takes a lot of self-awareness.

Speaker 2 (28:44):

Yes, no, it does. And that's why it usually takes a guide. Yeah, exactly. It really does. It takes a guide and you know, again, kind of that core confidence model that was not created by me, but having self-efficacy hope, optimism and resiliency, you know, these are things with, with a lot of difficult situations that, that our, our brain just has not been able to figure out the answer to. We tend to go down on the scale of those things, right? We're not trusting ourselves efficacy. We're not feeling very hopeful about it now, fascinatingly enough, you know, those that are fixers and types day and, and, and leaders if we can't fix something, if we don't know the solution to it, we're going to avoid it

Speaker 1 (29:25):

Totally a hundred percent. So it was easier and it's so much easier.

Speaker 2 (29:30):

We are to, to help and to show up for others and to fix the things that we know we can fix. And so again, then you see an imbalance and often times it's with the most challenging things that dealing with, again, personally, or professionally that we don't want to talk about. One of my clients, the other day was sharing,uyou know, this situation just resolved, but she was like, you know, I have been sitting on this,uspace like this, this land and space for the last 10 years. And I didn't know what to do with it. Now, when we got to the root of it, it was actually extremely emotional because she's in a family owned business. And it was something that a family member prior to her set up and, you know, really loved. And so it, it, it, it was way too. She couldn't make the decision because of the emotions connected with it. Uyou know, but she was like, I've been sitting on this forever and just avoiding it because I don't know what to do. So I can think of 50,000 other things to spend my time doing. You know, you can fix the kids, you can fix your friends, you can bring it into your professional career. And then meanwhile, some of the, you know, the other aspects are, are, are missing.

Speaker 1 (30:44):

I know I, when I get into those, those bouts of, Oh God, I can, I like will. And it's what I'm doing right now, which is why, when you said that you could do so, so many things to avoid. I'm like redoing my bookshelves, I'm doing some shredding of papers. I'm like crazy with the home edit. And now everything's in a rainbow, you know, I've got a lot of plastic bins hanging out everywhere. That's what I do when I'm trying to like, avoid looking at deeply at other things, you know? So that's what I've been doing for the past couple of weeks is I have been like cleaning out. Like my doorman was like, are you moving? I was like, Nope, not moving. Just, just finding stuff to do around the apartment.

Speaker 2 (31:30):

Exactly. Just being a great, you know, leader in the liver of life.

Speaker 1 (31:35):

Yeah, exactly. Cause I'm like, well, you know, if you come home to a nice clean apartment, it's better for your head. You can concentrate more when, you know, I probably need to go dig a little deeper and see, why am I doing all of this? And I know it's not just from watching the home edit, although it's a nice show. I'm sure it goes a little deeper.

Speaker 2 (31:56):

Well, it does, you know, and I'm glad you brought that up, you know, your, your personal situation, because I think that that helps all of us so much, you know, it's always nice to know when we're not alone. Right. And but you know, one of the biggest things that I've found in doing this work for as long as I have is people say to me, yeah. You know, I just, you know, everything you do sounds really great. Like that sounds awesome. It sounds like it really be helpful for me. And like, I don't really think I will, but I don't really think I want to go there. Uand we think, again, we think it's going to be hard, right? Like I was mentioning the client, the client earlier,u

Speaker 3 (32:40):

I have found that,

Speaker 2 (32:44):

And I think this is just my personality, but it's like, we got to make this fun and we gotta make this. Or action-oriented we kinda got to get the show on the road. So it's like, you know, again, if, if we're, if we're trying to leave a legacy, if you're trying to, you know, be productive and not give up on the idea that we have, you know, have success, then we are in a state in our country and in the world where, where we, we, yes, we can all, you know, afford to sit down on the couch with the weighted blanket and the wine and the ice cream, you know, but, but I just don't believe that, that we can afford too much of that anymore. I really don't, you know, like I, I need, I really feel so strongly that like, I need everybody to be functioning at a high level and it, it can be fun.

Speaker 2 (33:40):

It doesn't have to be like, Oh gosh, I'm, I'm, doesn't have to be so stressful. Yeah. Or like annoying, you know what I mean? Like, nobody really wants to like, look at themselves and see their shortcomings. And it's not about that. Like anybody that's trying to tell you it's about that. Th that's probably just perfectionist behavior showing up. It's not about that. It's about like, you've got to tap into your greatness. And when I say your greatness, meaning like just our essence, like our purpose of being here on earth, like something greater than ourselves, we've got to tap into that. We've gotten away from that. You know, that, that radical act of self-love that that's not just let me go draw a bubble bath. You know, that that is radically like, you know, we're all beautiful and we're here to share something great.

Speaker 2 (34:37):

One of the, one of the most upsetting thing, NGS, m don't know if you've ever experienced this, but, you know, as a physical therapist, when somebody has, host a limb or their pelvic floor is not working and they're upset with, you know, they have prolapse and they're like, Ugh, Ugh, this uterus, or, you know, gosh, my arm just looks awful. Now that pains me to my soul because I'm like, Oh, you know, like, gosh, your body has done so many miraculous things. I understand. And I empathize why you feel that way, but it, it makes me sad. And one of the things that has made me sad and being, you know, an advisor and a best friend to, you know, leaders who didn't even know if they needed that. Um,e of the things that makes me sad is when somebody comes to me and they're willing to just for a second share, I don't know if I can keep doing this anymore.

Speaker 2 (35:35):

I've thought about just giving it all up and going back to a simpler way of life and the same sort of thing. It makes me sad. Cause it's like, no, no, no, no, no, we don't. We don't have to do that. Like, you know, you, we don't have to, we just have to find some balance, right? Like you said, we don't need to be on one extreme. We don't need to be on the other extreme. We need to be somewhere in the middle and finding that is like super, super small finite changes. It's not the giant crazy things that changes that we like to make in our lives that we, you know, we think are going to be the solution. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (36:10):

I, I agree a hundred percent. And I think on that note, because I could keep talking about this all day. It's sadly, I don't know if the listeners want to listen to it all day. I'll do. I think they might. But I feel like we could keep going on and on here. But that being said before we wrap things up, just a couple of other things, number one, what, what are some of the big takeaways, or if there's one in particular takeaway that you want the listeners to leave this conversation with?

Speaker 4 (36:46):

Wow.

Speaker 2 (36:47):

I wasn't prepared for that. Dr. Lindsay. There is what I would say. The big takeaway that I really hope everybody understands is that when we get out of our head a little more often and start listening to the messages of the body, start listening to the messages of within then we really activate that core confidence. We step into a more effective way of leading and living and that's available to everybody and it's time to take it. Beautiful.

Speaker 1 (37:26):

That's a beautiful takeaway. Now you're welcome. And then of course, the last question that I ask everyone is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to yourself right out of PT school, a newbie.

Speaker 2 (37:42):

Ooh. Oh, this is, this is a fun one. So when I was in PT school, I knew PT was going to be a jump jumping off point for me. Ubut I, I didn't feel confident in that. And so honestly, what I would have said to myself then is, you know, yeah, you're a little bit of a fish.

Speaker 1 (38:06):

Yeah. You're doing things a little bit differently

Speaker 2 (38:08):

And it's okay. Just own, own your worst, keeping you which I'm sure I've always been doing, you know, but, but really telling myself that and gifting that to myself, that it's okay. It all starts lining up just one step at one step at a time.

Speaker 1 (38:25):

Awesome. And where can people find you? So social media or what's the best way? Yeah. So the best to get in touch with you,

Speaker 2 (38:36):

There are just so many ways to get, to get in touch with me. Of course social media let's see Facebook and Instagram is dr. Sarah Smith official. I'm also on LinkedIn, dr. Sarah Smith. It is Sara without an H. Usually people always are putting an H on my name, which is like,

Speaker 1 (38:52):

Denise is a Sara without an H. So I am very well aware of it.

Speaker 2 (38:56):

Thank you. And then www dot dr. Sara, D R dr. Sarah smith.com awesome. And website.

Speaker 1 (39:06):

Perfect. And we will have all of those links up at the podcast website podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart.com under this episode. And you saw, you also have an activate core confidence workbook that dr. Sara has so generously given as a free gift. So if you go to www.dot dr. Sarah smith.com/core hyphen confidence, did I get it right? You did. Perfect. And again, that will also be in the show notes, if you want your free gift from dr. Sarah, which is very generous. Thank you very much for all of the listeners, go and grab it from the show notes. So Sarah, thanks so much. Like I said, I could talk about this forever. It'll turn into a therapy session and that's not what you're doing here. I will not take advantage of you in that way.

Speaker 2 (39:57):

We can, we can do it at that.

Speaker 1 (40:03):

Thank you so much for coming on and sharing all of your knowledge. I appreciate it.

Speaker 2 (40:07):

Oh, you're so welcome. Thank you for having me.

Speaker 1 (40:09):

Of course. And everyone listening. Thanks so much. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

 

Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitterinstagram  and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest!  Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts

 

 

Nov 5, 2020

On this episode of the Healthy, Wealthy and Smart Podcast, I welcome Dr. Sarah Smith, PT, DPT to discuss how women can cultivate their core confidence. Dr. Sara Smith specializes in assisting female leaders, healers & creatives re-activate their Core Confidence. Specifically, women who wear many hats and desire to leave a legacy with less burnout and greater personal joy. 

In this episode, we discuss:

 

-How women focus attention on external approval and achievements/external successes.

 

-Why we need to be connected, aware and in tune with our pelvis.

 

-Messages the pelvis (and body) may be giving us that we are missing

 

-Core Confidence-what it is. why it is so important

 

-How does reducing urgency in daily life payoff- how the mental affects the physical body.

 

-How mental and spiritual Core Confidence and awareness of our Core can affect physical core strength.

 

Resources: 

 

Dr. Sarah’s Facebook

 

Dr. Sarah’s Instagram

 

Dr. Sarah’s LinkedIN

 

Activate Your Core Confidence Workbook

 

Discover Your Joy Coaching Session w/ Dr. Sarah

 

A big thank you to Net Health for sponsoring this episode! Learn more about the Redoc Patient Portal here. 

 

More Information about Dr. Smith:

Dr. Sara Smith specializes in assisting female leaders, healers & creatives re-activate their Core Confidence. Specifically women who wear many hats and desire to leave a legacy with less burnout and greater personal joy. 

Her unique approach focuses on connecting women back to their Core which holds authenticity, choice and immediate solutions so one can thrive both personally and professionally in all life situations.

This activation is vital so that women leading their families, communities and companies can stay fully present in all situations in order to

  • Communicate & interact authentically and calmly
  • Finally feel their private life & success matches their professional success with greater freedom, confidence, peace, focus and direction.
  • Flow through daily tasks and commitments with more focus, ease and an organized plan
  • Improve physical strength & major health gains
  • Live Wild & Bright- meaning! connected to our true, authentic, soul calling

She has blended her professional expertise as a Doctor of Physical Therapy- specializing in Women’s Health and Chronic Pain Management, Certified Yoga Instructor & Certified Wellness & Life Coach. With every personal & group experience Dr. Sara Smith offers, she is dedicated to the goal of assisting women of all ages to step back into their Core Confidence.

 

Read the Full Transcript below:

Speaker 1 (00:01):

Hey, Sarah, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on,

Speaker 2 (00:04):

Thank you so much for having me, dr. Litzy. It's glad to be here.

Speaker 1 (00:08):

Yeah. And so obviously I'm a physical therapist as are you, you have specialized in pelvic health and women's health, and then you have also kind of made that transition for at least part of your career into coaching, mainly other women from around the world. So before we get into the meat of the interview, I would love for you to share with the audience a little bit about your sort of career trajectory.

Speaker 2 (00:40):

Absolutely. Yes. So it's a, it's a little professional and it's a little personal, so it's the story tends to track with a little bit of both. I also went and got my yoga certification and that was actually the first thing that I did after physical therapy, you know, from, from physical therapy. A lot of that came because you know, in our profession we have a high turnaround and burnout ratio there at times. And I was a chronic fixer and helper and I was good at what I was doing to the point where I, you know, anybody came in and I was ready to, you know, help them with their issue. And so I went to my first yoga class, really just to chill myself out, get a little bit grounded and get, get real. And then from there it really almost overnight, it, it drastically shifted the way I was showing up and treating my patients at the time.

Speaker 2 (01:42):

I realized that kind of less was more, I realized that it was more important for me to listen instead of coming in with a plan and, you know, my own action sheet and really meeting people where, where we were, I think I was always empathetic, but it, it really enhanced that. And on top of that, I stopped getting sick. I was averaging, you know, a sinus infection once a month and just burned out already and young because I didn't want to, you know, you didn't want to fail having that syndrome. So really yoga kind of came first and then that solidified me for a while. I kept into the physical therapy world. I've always lived in rural areas in Virginia and I was on the Eastern shore of Virginia and I'm an only child. So I do like to be the only one doing something I like to be a little special.

Speaker 2 (02:40):

And, and so I realized nobody in the area was doing pelvic floor work. I had in all of my internships had some sort of connection to pelvic floor and women's health work. So I, I learned about it. I kind of knew about it. I didn't know if that was something that I wanted to get into. But I knew that it was a niche in the area that I was in. And so it was when I got into pelvic floor physical therapy work that I really professionally started to see this and, and chronic pain management has always been something that I just love helping people that have been to lots of therapists, physical therapists, and in there need assistance with that. But I was just seeing this mind body connection. I was seeing how with all of these individuals, and for some reason, I just happened to be working with a lot of leaders, professionals, directors, CEOs, you know, it just was kind of happening that way.

Speaker 2 (03:41):

Even some like rockstars lawyers, I don't know, Olympic swimmers, all these different people and stress was also happening mentally. You know, there were things going on either in their personal life or their professional life. That just seemed to be kind of also coming into what I was noticing in their physical body. So I was learning about it personally and just my own interest. And then I also was seeing it professionally and I was seeing when I started incorporating some of the yoga, you know, some of the mindfulness based practices and stress management breathing that I was getting better results. And I just am a result junkie. You know, I'm not interested in putting a patch on something. I want somebody to come back to me six or seven or 10 years later and be like, I'm still using what you did. So there was that.

Speaker 2 (04:34):

And then on top of that what I got into pelvic floor therapy, my started having children and my, our, our first child who's now seven was we found out at a very young age that he had an ultra rare genetic mutation. So it was de Novo. It wasn't for my husband or myself and severe speech apraxia. So I started getting, you know, deep into the world of executive functioning and,ureally learning more and more about kind of, I always loved the nervous system, but, you know, I became even more fascinated with how to manage that,uand, and work with it. And so that, those two things kind of happening simultaneously are what brought me into, into coaching. Umnd specifically working with female leaders, hecause that, I don't know, that's just like a deep within personal mission is I feel like women are here to make a major contribution.

Speaker 2 (05:42):

I feel like the time, the time is ripe, the time is now. But we've learned and write in it in a great way. We've learned from a very male dominated structure,uwhich doesn't always work for women. And,uit can, it definitely works. It's not that it's, you know, not working, but there, there are some things that need to slightly shift and,uI'm just, I really want to be able to contribute to women, being able to be in these leadership roles and do it without as much burnout do it without as much self-sacrificing,ufamily sacrificing community sacrificing. Uso yeah.

Speaker 1 (06:32):

Awesome. Well, thanks for that. Thanks for kind of letting the listeners get a little bit deeper into kind of who you are and why you do what you do, because it all leads into our discussion today. And it's, it's really all about as you say, why we need to be connected, why we need to be aware and in tune with our pelvis. So as a physical therapist, we can all agree that yes, we need to be in tune with that area. Everyone has a pelvis, everyone has that musculature and, and the functions of but coming from, I think your unique perspective of both physical therapist and coach and looking really beyond just the pelvic floor, which we should all be doing anyway. So, so give us your take on why we need to be connected.

Speaker 2 (07:25):

Yeah. You know, I've seen in, in the realm of success, leadership, entrepreneurship anybody who's, who's type a you know, th there's a lot of overthinking long to do lists. There's a lot of being up in our head, you know, w where do we go next? And I say, we, because this, you know, I've, you're only a great teacher if you've been there yourself, right. And, and are still in the depths of it. And so, you know, we th there's lots, that's constantly swirling up in our head, but we also know, and, and, you know, a variety of different resource research sources have shown us this, that we can't access all of the solutions to our biggest professional, personal life challenges. If we're in constant thinking mode all day long, not to mention, you know, roughly 80% of all thoughts are habitually negative, which is not very helpful for solving problems. And so the reason that I am so drawn to what I call, you know, well, it's not just me calling it a core confidence and getting people specifically into their pelvis and back into their body is, is reducing the overthinking so that we can access again, creativity, focus, productivity, you know, improved, sleep, stress, relieving, you know, hormone responses. You know, I could, I could go on and on.

Speaker 1 (09:01):

Yeah. And so you brought up the, the the words, core confidence. So can you explain what, what does that mean? Because I have a feeling it may mean a couple of different things to a couple of different people, but in the work that you do in helping people become more productive, improve their leadership, improve their life, what does that, what does core confidence?

Speaker 2 (09:28):

Yeah. I love how you said that, you know, it means something to, there's lots of different ways to describe it in there. There really is. You know, to me, and also the, the clients that I've worked with for many, many years now, it means freedom. It means expansiveness. It means seeking joy. It means effectively, you know, being effective at what they do. Meanings means also having more energy core confidence really is being able to go within yourself and access that wellspring of inner wisdom really access your, your yes or no. And a lot of times, and this is, this is actually comes from, from those in the research field. Core confidence also is a mixture of self-efficacy of hope of optimism and resilience. External confidence. I don't think we should be talking about core confidence without also touching on external confidence and external confidence is what the majority of us learn to, to seek after.

Speaker 2 (10:43):

And we're constantly seeking after it. The external confidence is, you know, does dr. [inaudible] Like me, or, you know, what I should be doing right now, or, you know, these are the, the, the dreams that, that others are doing. So this marketing strategy has worked for them. This app has worked for them, let me do this, let me, you know, follow this meal plan. And so, you know, we're constantly as humans chasing others, things that have worked for them. And, and we're very often, again, not realizing we're up in our head and we're not really checking in with the, the little voice that's like, that's kind of a waste of time.

Speaker 1 (11:32):

Yeah, totally. I, I always find that it's so much easier to look for that external validation and get our confidence from that external validation, then what we do than what we think we are doing. Does that make sense? Solutely yeah, so I, I mean, and, and we're all human and all humans fall into that trap. So can you kind of give us an example of how you might work with someone to help develop this core confidence and help to bring in more joy and help get them a little more grounded into themselves? Are there any sort of exercises or things that you do with people that you can give this as an example? Yeah,

Speaker 2 (12:15):

That's a, that's a great you know, I I'd say one of the main tips that I, that is probably ended up being my, my signature Sarah move,uhas been really, you know, so listening to somebody, I really love deep listening. I mean, I think when you start listening to someone, at least for me, I don't know this is, this is, h gift that I have is I start reading between the lines. Umnd actually I'm kind of diverting for a moment. A lot of times when I work with people, I don't do it over zoom. We don't do video. Umecause when you look somebody in the eye, sometimes it's hard to be a hundred percent truthful, you know, or again, you kind of fall into the, the external competence trap. Umnd so we do it all over the phone or, you know, with the video off so that I can really deeply listen.

Speaker 2 (13:09):

And what I'll do is, you know, if there's a belief in there for example, I was working with somebody the other day and she shared, you know, while we were talking about her personal life. And and she was like, you know, if I kind of keep having these, these, if I close the door on this relationship, I'm probably actually going to have to do a lot of hard work on myself to pick up the pieces. And what I asked her was, well, well, is that true? That working on yourself has to be hard.

Speaker 1 (13:47):

And when

Speaker 2 (13:47):

We, I call it, like, we've got to, we've got to go. I like going down the rabbit hole with somebody of like, really being like, why, why are we fearful about this? Like, let's, let's talk about it. Let's get to the root and let's shine the light on what, what the narrative is with this overthinking piece. Once we shine the light on it, half of the work is done because we've brought in awareness. And whenever you bring in awareness works time.

Speaker 1 (14:18):

Absolutely. Yeah. And it's, it's, you know, that you're right. Being able to listen and listen well is a gift, but it's also something luckily that can be practiced and can be worked upon as physical therapists. I think a lot of us, a lot of us are pretty good at listening. But when you work with, like you said, that chronic pain population, you really get, I think, a lot more in tune to what the person is saying. And you also learn how to ask those questions to draw out more thoughts.

Speaker 2 (14:54):

Absolutely. Yes. And here's the interesting thing that I've found. Okay. and, and I, a lot of this comes from like archetypes and youngian psychology is we have different aspects of our, of our psyche and of our personalities. Right. And a lot of times what you'll find is we learn these skills, we practice these skills professionally, but when it comes to the, behind the scenes for ourselves, we're almost like different people. I had a client the other day, you know, she is a director and has, has a large, very well-known board behind her. And and she's like, you know, if the board was to be a fly on the wall and kind of experience my personal life, they they'd be like what, you're not even the same person. Because suddenly things become matters of the heart. They're no longer again, the, the head, you know, so professionally relating people through this very well yet, we're not really sometimes having that, that advisor, that best friend, that we didn't even know we needed behind the scenes to help us hash out our own stumbling blocks. And that's where I think in, in leadership and entrepreneurship and being a CEO of, you know, your business and your life and trying to be healthy, wealthy, and smart, I think that's, we need that now.

Speaker 1 (16:22):

And why do you think that's so hard

Speaker 2 (16:24):

To,

Speaker 1 (16:27):

To confide in others of, you know, it's, it's a lot easier to say, Oh, you know, I, I didn't have any new patients this month. So, you know, I really w what do you think, how can I help? How can I get more patients? That's easy, right. To talk about our business and, and to talk about our our professional life. But why do you think it's so hard for people to confide in others on a more personal level?

Speaker 2 (16:55):

Hmm. I love this question. I really love it. Of course, I'm sure it's very multifactorial. I find that I don't, you know, I don't have any research on this, but I find that if you start looking back even into it and not like massively, but you start looking back into childhood, you know, where a lot of habitual patterns are formed and thought patterns are formed. A lot of times you'll see, you'll see trends there, but, you know, one vein of research shows that about half of all CEOs, those at the top are experiencing loneliness and loneliness in the sense that, you know, there has to be a level of healthy ego and confidence, right? B core confidence or confidence in order to want to succeed. You know, all sorts of people are teaching us out there and showing us that, you know, you gotta have some grit, you gotta have some resiliency if you wanna play this game.

Speaker 2 (18:01):

And it is a game. And so, you know, there there's factors of like, you can't trust everyone, right. If you have team members underneath of you traditionally that's really changing, I think, but traditionally we're taught, you know, you don't mix business and personal life. You don't do that. That's a no, no. Now you'll see that changing. And that's continuing to change because you know, many psychologists are beginning to study really resiliency and entrepreneurship and, and understanding more specifically how they're tied together, because it's, th that's really just a new field of, of understanding. He can't trust people, you know, and I think many have experienced, again, maybe it was in the past or more recently you know, you do share some of those personal moments and it might come back to bite you or suddenly the, the inner critic and other thought thought in the brain comes up and says, Ooh, that was not a good idea. You're probably that is going to backfire. You know, that could make you look weak. So I think it's very multifactorial.

Speaker 1 (19:16):

And I guess this is kind of where having someone, you know, outside of your direct business to have as a resource and to help you as a coach I guess I would, I'm assuming that that's where coaching comes into play, because you can kind of be that person to sort of help with the personal and the professional, because I can only assume that they're closely related.

Speaker 2 (19:44):

Right. They are way more closely related than people realize. And your professional self that like the way you act professionally is often different than the way you act and your personal life. Like, can you, can you relate to that?

Speaker 1 (20:02):

Yeah, of course. Okay.

Speaker 2 (20:05):

And so, you know, cause I, I, yeah, same thing for me too, but I'm always interested, you know, in what, what somebody, his answer would be.

Speaker 1 (20:12):

Yeah, no, there's, there's no question that, that we're a little different in our personal life than in our professional life. And, you know, it's funny to say, because I was having thoughts around that yesterday. Because you know, we're all human, right? Every once in a while, like we screw something up, we say something we didn't want to say we regretted afterwards. And yet you're vilified for being a human being. You're vilified for saying something that, yeah, like maybe what you said, wasn't the best thing to say, but you take ownership over it. You say, Hey, listen. Like, yeah. I mean, I, you know, I let my emotions get the best of me, which never ever happens in my professional life. Right. Right. In my professional life never happens. And yet all of a sudden you're demoted in the eyes of so many people, but all you did was you were just a human being and you said something, or you wrote something that you later like, ah, I can't believe I did that. And because it's not a podcast, we can't go back and edit it out. So I think that there is this, this weird kind of, if you start to melt the two together, you're going to be screwed.

Speaker 2 (21:33):

Yeah. It's a way or another, it's a belief. Absolutely. And I think that we need guidance to blend them appropriately, you know, because the answer is not, well, you'll see this as a marketing strategy now. Right. Where it's like, okay, show the behind the scenes and show yourself and be yourself and dah, dah, dah. Well, I think that there's always a, a middle ground to all of that, that we need to be aiming for. And again, it has to feel true to you, you know, like you have to get back into a state of checking in with yourself and not checking in with the head and the thoughts of like, okay, is this an alignment for me? And so, you know, in a lot of cases when you're blood, when you're, I like drawing on the professional self, like let's say, I might say, okay, what would professional dr.

Speaker 2 (22:23):

Litzy do when we're talking about something personal, because that's how the, the, the two aspects of you can really start blending together and start working together as a team and be like an integrated, whole healthy, beautiful person, right. Uwho can stay true to your individual values? You know, we get to like explore what those individual values are and being true to those,uin, in order to make it work for us, I've ever really cool example of a client who,ushe's in the hospital system and I'm pretty high up. And she was offered. We had been working for, I don't know, probably three to six months or something we'd been, she had been, and we were mostly working in the personal field, you know, but of course the professional always, always blends in. And she had been offered this incredible opportunity to lead this team.

Speaker 2 (23:25):

This was just in addition to her goals that she already professionally had for the year. And as she sat with that, and as I sat with that with her, she realized, you know, if this had been last year, I would have said yes to that. And I'm very flattered, but the truth is, is if I say yes to that, then all that I'm doing to take care of myself so that I can show up to meet my professional goals is actually going to be derailed. And so at that moment, it wasn't in alignment for her. And what was even better about that was then she was able to go to her boss and to communicate that I call it like, you know, communicating from the core, but communicate that not from up in the head like, Oh, no, I wonder what I'm doing. I hope, you know, hope I'm not really screwing this up, communicating it with authenticity, with crowdedness, with strength, right. With empowerment. And, you know, her superior was like best decision you ever made. I really appreciate it. Really championed to her now, how awesome would that be if we could have more of that in our small businesses and in all of our workplaces and all of our organizations,

Speaker 1 (24:43):

I mean, that's an ideal situation when the ideal situation, but I think it's hard when you're constantly kind of seeking out success and seeking to be quote unquote the best at what you do and to get that recognition and to build your business and to make more money. So you can live the lifestyle that you want to live and provide for your family or your friends or whomever is in your, your world. But how does, how does making these decisions, like you said, these sort of more grounded decisions where, where they are emotional versus making these decisions as strictly like pros and cons, like an intellectual pro and con list, you know what I mean? So how do you, how do you coach people in that tug of war?

Speaker 2 (25:41):

I hope I can answer the question of how do you coach people, because sometimes you just have to see it, you know, and experience it. But you know if you look, if you talk to anyone in the financial world, the stock market is emotional emotions drive everything. That's true. Right. And you know, if we're the faster, we're aware of that, the more tapped in that, that we're going to be. And so that's actually, what's happening is a, is a lot of times where we're making these leadership decisions, we're making these personal decisions when we're in a state of emotion. And often when we're, you know, emotions are coming from thoughts, right. You know, you know, the, the, the little wheel starts going and then suddenly, you know, we have these emotions with us. A lot of times you don't even know what the sensation is in the body, because we're, again, we're kind of more of in the head.

Speaker 2 (26:36):

And so when you can access, and what I do is often just really helping somebody with very challenging. Like I prefer the challenging situations, you know, where it's like, okay, why do I keep getting into this relationship? Why do I keep not, you know, being able to climb the ladder? Why is it I can't get, get know fit in the self-care pieces of it. And when we get to the root of it, a lot of times it's because things are happening in an emotional realm. And we've got to be aware of that, go down the rabbit hole of the actual, like fear and worry. And why, like, why are we responding the way we're responding? Why are we doing that? And then once you get to that, then you can actually get to the clarity piece where you get the clouds and the, you know, the fog out from your face. Right. You can go, okay, pro this con this dah, dah, dah, dah. Okay. Now I've got my marching orders go. And I, I don't know about you, but I like marching orders. I like to know the next step.

Speaker 1 (27:37):

Yeah, absolutely. And, and I think, you know, a lot of people who are in leadership positions or who are going out to be that entrepreneur, their dreams, like you are a type a person. I think you are a lot of just pros and cons. But I do think that the emotional segment of things does have to come into play because if your pros and cons from a very sort of robotic sense is, is okay, I guess, but then how is it going to make you feel, how is it going to affect your life? Are you going to be happy with your decision? Are you doing something because you feel pressure to do it because you have to do it, quote unquote. So I think being able to tap into that core confidence in that and your core values in order to help you make decisions is important. So it's like, I don't want to be on either pole, like purely emotional, purely cerebral, but you want to have, you want to be able to kind of get in there and go down that rabbit hole, which is not easy and takes a lot of self-awareness.

Speaker 2 (28:44):

Yes, no, it does. And that's why it usually takes a guide. Yeah, exactly. It really does. It takes a guide and you know, again, kind of that core confidence model that was not created by me, but having self-efficacy hope, optimism and resiliency, you know, these are things with, with a lot of difficult situations that, that our, our brain just has not been able to figure out the answer to. We tend to go down on the scale of those things, right? We're not trusting ourselves efficacy. We're not feeling very hopeful about it now, fascinatingly enough, you know, those that are fixers and types day and, and, and leaders if we can't fix something, if we don't know the solution to it, we're going to avoid it

Speaker 1 (29:25):

Totally a hundred percent. So it was easier and it's so much easier.

Speaker 2 (29:30):

We are to, to help and to show up for others and to fix the things that we know we can fix. And so again, then you see an imbalance and often times it's with the most challenging things that dealing with, again, personally, or professionally that we don't want to talk about. One of my clients, the other day was sharing,uyou know, this situation just resolved, but she was like, you know, I have been sitting on this,uspace like this, this land and space for the last 10 years. And I didn't know what to do with it. Now, when we got to the root of it, it was actually extremely emotional because she's in a family owned business. And it was something that a family member prior to her set up and, you know, really loved. And so it, it, it, it was way too. She couldn't make the decision because of the emotions connected with it. Uyou know, but she was like, I've been sitting on this forever and just avoiding it because I don't know what to do. So I can think of 50,000 other things to spend my time doing. You know, you can fix the kids, you can fix your friends, you can bring it into your professional career. And then meanwhile, some of the, you know, the other aspects are, are, are missing.

Speaker 1 (30:44):

I know I, when I get into those, those bouts of, Oh God, I can, I like will. And it's what I'm doing right now, which is why, when you said that you could do so, so many things to avoid. I'm like redoing my bookshelves, I'm doing some shredding of papers. I'm like crazy with the home edit. And now everything's in a rainbow, you know, I've got a lot of plastic bins hanging out everywhere. That's what I do when I'm trying to like, avoid looking at deeply at other things, you know? So that's what I've been doing for the past couple of weeks is I have been like cleaning out. Like my doorman was like, are you moving? I was like, Nope, not moving. Just, just finding stuff to do around the apartment.

Speaker 2 (31:30):

Exactly. Just being a great, you know, leader in the liver of life.

Speaker 1 (31:35):

Yeah, exactly. Cause I'm like, well, you know, if you come home to a nice clean apartment, it's better for your head. You can concentrate more when, you know, I probably need to go dig a little deeper and see, why am I doing all of this? And I know it's not just from watching the home edit, although it's a nice show. I'm sure it goes a little deeper.

Speaker 2 (31:56):

Well, it does, you know, and I'm glad you brought that up, you know, your, your personal situation, because I think that that helps all of us so much, you know, it's always nice to know when we're not alone. Right. And but you know, one of the biggest things that I've found in doing this work for as long as I have is people say to me, yeah. You know, I just, you know, everything you do sounds really great. Like that sounds awesome. It sounds like it really be helpful for me. And like, I don't really think I will, but I don't really think I want to go there. Uand we think, again, we think it's going to be hard, right? Like I was mentioning the client, the client earlier,u

Speaker 3 (32:40):

I have found that,

Speaker 2 (32:44):

And I think this is just my personality, but it's like, we got to make this fun and we gotta make this. Or action-oriented we kinda got to get the show on the road. So it's like, you know, again, if, if we're, if we're trying to leave a legacy, if you're trying to, you know, be productive and not give up on the idea that we have, you know, have success, then we are in a state in our country and in the world where, where we, we, yes, we can all, you know, afford to sit down on the couch with the weighted blanket and the wine and the ice cream, you know, but, but I just don't believe that, that we can afford too much of that anymore. I really don't, you know, like I, I need, I really feel so strongly that like, I need everybody to be functioning at a high level and it, it can be fun.

Speaker 2 (33:40):

It doesn't have to be like, Oh gosh, I'm, I'm, doesn't have to be so stressful. Yeah. Or like annoying, you know what I mean? Like, nobody really wants to like, look at themselves and see their shortcomings. And it's not about that. Like anybody that's trying to tell you it's about that. Th that's probably just perfectionist behavior showing up. It's not about that. It's about like, you've got to tap into your greatness. And when I say your greatness, meaning like just our essence, like our purpose of being here on earth, like something greater than ourselves, we've got to tap into that. We've gotten away from that. You know, that, that radical act of self-love that that's not just let me go draw a bubble bath. You know, that that is radically like, you know, we're all beautiful and we're here to share something great.

Speaker 2 (34:37):

One of the, one of the most upsetting thing, NGS, m don't know if you've ever experienced this, but, you know, as a physical therapist, when somebody has, host a limb or their pelvic floor is not working and they're upset with, you know, they have prolapse and they're like, Ugh, Ugh, this uterus, or, you know, gosh, my arm just looks awful. Now that pains me to my soul because I'm like, Oh, you know, like, gosh, your body has done so many miraculous things. I understand. And I empathize why you feel that way, but it, it makes me sad. And one of the things that has made me sad and being, you know, an advisor and a best friend to, you know, leaders who didn't even know if they needed that. Um,e of the things that makes me sad is when somebody comes to me and they're willing to just for a second share, I don't know if I can keep doing this anymore.

Speaker 2 (35:35):

I've thought about just giving it all up and going back to a simpler way of life and the same sort of thing. It makes me sad. Cause it's like, no, no, no, no, no, we don't. We don't have to do that. Like, you know, you, we don't have to, we just have to find some balance, right? Like you said, we don't need to be on one extreme. We don't need to be on the other extreme. We need to be somewhere in the middle and finding that is like super, super small finite changes. It's not the giant crazy things that changes that we like to make in our lives that we, you know, we think are going to be the solution. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (36:10):

I, I agree a hundred percent. And I think on that note, because I could keep talking about this all day. It's sadly, I don't know if the listeners want to listen to it all day. I'll do. I think they might. But I feel like we could keep going on and on here. But that being said before we wrap things up, just a couple of other things, number one, what, what are some of the big takeaways, or if there's one in particular takeaway that you want the listeners to leave this conversation with?

Speaker 4 (36:46):

Wow.

Speaker 2 (36:47):

I wasn't prepared for that. Dr. Lindsay. There is what I would say. The big takeaway that I really hope everybody understands is that when we get out of our head a little more often and start listening to the messages of the body, start listening to the messages of within then we really activate that core confidence. We step into a more effective way of leading and living and that's available to everybody and it's time to take it. Beautiful.

Speaker 1 (37:26):

That's a beautiful takeaway. Now you're welcome. And then of course, the last question that I ask everyone is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to yourself right out of PT school, a newbie.

Speaker 2 (37:42):

Ooh. Oh, this is, this is a fun one. So when I was in PT school, I knew PT was going to be a jump jumping off point for me. Ubut I, I didn't feel confident in that. And so honestly, what I would have said to myself then is, you know, yeah, you're a little bit of a fish.

Speaker 1 (38:06):

Yeah. You're doing things a little bit differently

Speaker 2 (38:08):

And it's okay. Just own, own your worst, keeping you which I'm sure I've always been doing, you know, but, but really telling myself that and gifting that to myself, that it's okay. It all starts lining up just one step at one step at a time.

Speaker 1 (38:25):

Awesome. And where can people find you? So social media or what's the best way? Yeah. So the best to get in touch with you,

Speaker 2 (38:36):

There are just so many ways to get, to get in touch with me. Of course social media let's see Facebook and Instagram is dr. Sarah Smith official. I'm also on LinkedIn, dr. Sarah Smith. It is Sara without an H. Usually people always are putting an H on my name, which is like,

Speaker 1 (38:52):

Denise is a Sara without an H. So I am very well aware of it.

Speaker 2 (38:56):

Thank you. And then www dot dr. Sara, D R dr. Sarah smith.com awesome. And website.

Speaker 1 (39:06):

Perfect. And we will have all of those links up at the podcast website podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart.com under this episode. And you saw, you also have an activate core confidence workbook that dr. Sara has so generously given as a free gift. So if you go to www.dot dr. Sarah smith.com/core hyphen confidence, did I get it right? You did. Perfect. And again, that will also be in the show notes, if you want your free gift from dr. Sarah, which is very generous. Thank you very much for all of the listeners, go and grab it from the show notes. So Sarah, thanks so much. Like I said, I could talk about this forever. It'll turn into a therapy session and that's not what you're doing here. I will not take advantage of you in that way.

Speaker 2 (39:57):

We can, we can do it at that.

Speaker 1 (40:03):

Thank you so much for coming on and sharing all of your knowledge. I appreciate it.

Speaker 2 (40:07):

Oh, you're so welcome. Thank you for having me.

Speaker 1 (40:09):

Of course. And everyone listening. Thanks so much. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

 

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